Arc-Fault protection for gas range

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ronnie

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Does anyone know why I cannot install a 120v 20a duplex receptacle for the gas range that comes of the bedroom branch circuit and is protected by a 20a Arc-Fault breaker?

I had an inspector that said I could not install a Arc-Fault breaker on the gas range outlet, because if the breaker tripped the house would up fill gas. He wants the gas range outlet on a dedicated circuit.

I asked what section of the NEC I could find this. He said Authority Having Jurisdiction.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I can't imagine why anyone would bring a bedroom circuit into a kitchen outlet circuit these days.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
The inspector is just plain wrong.

What would happen if the power went out? Would the house still fill up with gas?






And you were right to demand a Code section.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
Does anyone know why I cannot install a 120v 20a duplex receptacle for the gas range that comes of the bedroom branch circuit and is protected by a 20a Arc-Fault breaker?

I had an inspector that said I could not install a Arc-Fault breaker on the gas range outlet, because if the breaker tripped the house would up fill gas. He wants the gas range outlet on a dedicated circuit.

I asked what section of the NEC I could find this. He said Authority Having Jurisdiction.
The receptacle for the gas igniter on a gas range can be installed on an AFCI protected bedroom circuit if you want, not a good design but not an NEC violation. It would be better to come off the small appliance branch circuit.

The inspector is clueless if they think that tripping the igniter circuit would cause the house to fill up with gas.:rolleyes:

Also there is NO NEC section that permits the inspector to make up his or here own code rules. 90.4 does not say what many inspectors think it says.

Chris
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
is the range not an appliance?
Last time I looked it was.
So how can you have a outlet in a kichen from the bedroom?
 

SEO

Senior Member
Location
Michigan
I asked what section of the NEC I could find this. He said Authority Having Jurisdiction.
If your area is on the NEC then the inspector is wrong. Some inspectors use 90.4 when they don't know something. It sounds like he is using that section for vest pocket rules.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
is the range not an appliance?
Last time I looked it was.
So how can you have a outlet in a kichen from the bedroom?
Under normal circuimstances fixed appliances can't be installed on the small appliance branch circuits. For example the dishwasher can be supplied by a 15 amp circuit dedicated or a 15 amp circuit with other loads provided that the dishwasher does not draw more than 7.5 amps. (See 210.23(A)(2)).

There is an exception that allows the receptacle for an igniter for a gas range to be supplied by a small appliance branch circuit. (See exception #2 to 210.52(B)(2))

Chris
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I belive the inspector is right for the wrong reason!
look at 210.52 (B).... but these Kitchen circuits are to have no have other outlets.....
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
I belive the inspector is right for the wrong reason!
look at 210.52 (B).... but these Kitchen circuits are to have no have other outlets.....
I don't understand what you are saying?

If you connect the igniter receptacle for a gas range on a bedroom circuit it would not be a small appliance branch cricuit and 210.52(B)(2) would not apply.

Chris
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I don't understand what you are saying?

If you connect the igniter receptacle for a gas range on a bedroom circuit it would not be a small appliance branch cricuit and 210.52(B)(2) would not apply.

Chris
But they way I read the code ( could be wrong) That all outlets in the kitchen need to comply with 210.52 (B) That means that circuit cannot leave the kitchen and go to the bedroom. That's my take!
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
But they way I read the code ( could be wrong) That all outlets in the kitchen need to comply with 210.52 (B) That means that circuit cannot leave the kitchen and go to the bedroom. That's my take!
The only requirement is that you provide two SABCs per 210.52(B)(1).

If you put the stove on a bedroom circuit, it's not on a SABC and the rules of 210.52 don't apply to it.
 
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Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I thought that no other outlets than Appliance outlets could be in a kitchen , pantry, dine, or similar areas.

What would be the reason for this anyway? It seems like a lod of discussion because the guy wanted to save a couple of feet of 12-2. and probably fed from the bedroom oultet on the wall behind the cook top.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
I thought that no other outlets than Appliance outlets could be in a kitchen , pantry, dine, or similar areas.
The small appliance branch circuits are to supply all wall and floor receptacles covered in 210.52(A) and all countertop receptacles covered by 210.52(C).

The receptacle for the igniter for a gas range is not covered by either 210.52(A) or 210.52(C). If it was then there would be no need to have Exception #2 to 210.52(B)(2).

Chris

P.S. I moved this thread to the NEC forum because it is not related to a code change proposal for the 2011 NEC.
 
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