Arc/Ground Fault Locations

jetlag

Senior Member
I have been retired a while, would someone give me an update on all the circuits that require combination arc / ground fault breakers in a new panel now ? I have heard every 120 volt circuit in the panel including the lighting circuits needs the combo breaker . Do any 240 volt need the combo ? Thanks
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I have been retired a while, would someone give me an update on all the circuits that require combination arc / ground fault breakers in a new panel now ? I have heard every 120 volt circuit in the panel including the lighting circuits needs the combo breaker . Do any 240 volt need the combo ? Thanks
There is no requirement to use combination AFCI/GFCI breakers, in fact Square D is the only one I am aware of that currently has such a breaker available on the market, though others are likely coming.

The "combination" type AFCI's you likely have heard of is the newer (not all that new anymore) AFCI breakers that have "combination" series and parallel arc detection. The early generation AFCI's did not detect both types of faults, even though they marketed them as though they were supposed to protect against both types of faults. So unless you have some of those early breakers on hand, all AFCI's you will purchase new meet the newer standard.

Now 2014 NEC has introduced AFCI protection requirements to areas that typically will also require GFCI protection, and has gotten to the point where there is not much left in a dwelling that will not have AFCI protection. GFCI requirements has remained mostly the same with some changes in the kitchen - primarily the dishwasher needs GFCI regardless of location or connection method, and all receptacles within 6 feet of the sink will require GFCI whether on the countertop or not.
 

mwm1752

Senior Member
Location
Aspen, Colo
I have been retired a while, would someone give me an update on all the circuits that require combination arc / ground fault breakers in a new panel now ? I have heard every 120 volt circuit in the panel including the lighting circuits needs the combo breaker . Do any 240 volt need the combo ? Thanks
NEC 2014 added a bunch of words creating a SNAFU IMO-- AFCI Bottom line exclude bathrooms & garages in residential units. 120 v only GFI requirements are included in some of the areas that require AFCI protection-- Kitchens - within 6" of all sinks - dishwashers to name a few. bla bla bla nanny state of mind --
 

jetlag

Senior Member
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Thanks for replies , I forgot to to mention this is a 2014 dwelling . Ok , I was a little confused about the combination breakers , I was told these protect both arc and ground fault , that is not true , correct ? They only protect arc fault . So I can still use ground fault receptacles in bath , kitchen, dish wash , and garage without an arc fault breaker , correct ?. Now I still have a question , my lighting is all on separate circuits from the receptacles , do the lights require arc fault breakers now ? Thanks dan
 
Thanks for replies , I forgot to to mention this is a 2014 dwelling . Ok , I was a little confused about the combination breakers , I was told these protect both arc and ground fault , that is not true , correct ? They only protect arc fault . So I can still use ground fault receptacles in bath , kitchen, dish wash , and garage without an arc fault breaker , correct ?. Now I still have a question , my lighting is all on separate circuits from the receptacles , do the lights require arc fault breakers now ? Thanks dan
yes, receptacles, lights, hardwired smokes and CO2's (any 120volt outlets) in all the specified and/or similar areas.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Thanks for replies , I forgot to to mention this is a 2014 dwelling . Ok , I was a little confused about the combination breakers , I was told these protect both arc and ground fault , that is not true , correct ? They only protect arc fault . So I can still use ground fault receptacles in bath , kitchen, dish wash , and garage without an arc fault breaker , correct ?. Now I still have a question , my lighting is all on separate circuits from the receptacles , do the lights require arc fault breakers now ? Thanks dan
"Combination" depends on exactly what you are talking about. Like I said there are two generations of AFCI the second was called "combination" type because it includes both the first generation plus the second generation protection schemes. Code has for several years required the "combination" type of protection provided by the newer generation type units. (like I said before, you will not find the old style for sale unless someone has some old stock on hand so you generally don't have to worry too much about this particular term correct)

Then there are companies starting to put combination devices on the market that provide both GFCI and AFCI protection.

What kind of stinks about this is the use of the word "combination" for two different aspects involving a similar product and all the confusion it is going to create. Many thought the first use of the word "combination" meant there was GFCI and AFCI protection but there was not, now that is being added:happyno::happyno:

I do not have copy of 2014 code yet, but in 2011 and even earlier codes AFCI was required for all 120 volt 15 and 20 amp outlets in the areas mentioned in 210.12 Basic requirements that all 120 volt 15 and 20 amp outlets are required to be protected has not changed much if at all, but each new code has added new areas to the list. 2014 has left it so there are not many areas left, mostly the bath, garage, outdoor outlets and maybe but don't hold me to it .. unfinished basement areas.

And don't forget an "outlet" is not limited to receptacles, anyplace where power is used basically there is an outlet, so lighting, heaters, appliances... if they are 15 or 20 amps @ 120 volts and are in the areas mentioned require AFCI protection whether cord and plug connected or hard wired.
 

jetlag

Senior Member
Thanks for replies

Thanks for replies

I believe I have enough to proceed . I do have 2 more items I'm not sure about , does the 120 volt washer outlet require ground and arc fault ? Does the circuit to an unfinished basement require arc fault ? It has lights and a single GFCI receptacle . The reason for all the questions is my code books are 2006 and I'm building my own house . Thanks Dan
 

mwm1752

Senior Member
Location
Aspen, Colo
The real beauty of the 2014 NEC is that now the AFCI protection does not have to be a combination type( does not mean you can't use them or adjust your wiring method differently). You are able as an option, to use the AFCI branch protection breaker with a device that is only rated as AFCI branch protected to comply with the AFCI protection requirements. Now throw the areas the also include the outlets to be GFCI protected we have a party. All resets shall be readilty accessible -- from my earlier post bla-bla-bla nanny state
 

mwm1752

Senior Member
Location
Aspen, Colo
I believe I have enough to proceed . I do have 2 more items I'm not sure about , does the 120 volt washer outlet require ground and arc fault ?
Yes -- Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment.
210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection
(A) Dwelling Units.
All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampe re branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of the means described in 210.12(A) (1) through (6):
210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel
(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit. GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations.

Does the circuit to an unfinished basement require arc fault ? It has lights and a single GFCI receptacle . The reason for all the questions is my code books are 2006 and I'm building my own house . Is it a similar area? may be your inspectors call -- Probanly yes due to the additions of closets,hallways & laundryrooms
 
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