Article 334

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mj63

Member
I was sent to look at a house that had a pipe burst in the ceiling of a vacation house that ran for 6 weeks before the problem was found, the sheet rock had all fallen out of the ceiling and was coming off the walls, insulation in walls and ceiling is soaked all staples and nails in boxes and panel rusted.
The boss says that if the wire is tested "megged" and it tests ok that it can be reused, my take is 334.12 (B)4 says not to be used in damp or wet locations, so I dont think it will be compliant to reuse it.
I'm sure to have a licensed testing agent come and test all the wires would be more than rewiring the place anyway, I'm curious if anyone has dealt with a situation like this before and if so what are the opinions?
 

Chamuit

Senior Member
Location
Texas
I don't think it is a violation as you are thinking. You could say the same and make someone re-wire a house after it rained and water got on wire on one wall.

One problem you could have is, if there was enough saturation, that there is water inside the sheathing.

I would probably calculate the costs and (go with the lower) present the option to the HO or insurance adjuster.
 

Volta

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Opinions will vary, that is for sure :roll:. My feeling is that it can be compliant to leave it after testing. Assuming a mordern-style cable, not cloth-covered. Someone here once posted a report claiming that the romex was suitable for use after temporary submersion in these situations. The sheath of NM is not fugus resistant, however.

The devices and splices should be replaced.
 
In the past I had this question come up where a condo building had been wired prior to water proofing. The romex cables were exposed to rain or drain off through the four floors. The question was posed to Southwire and they recommended that if the paper inside the cable assembly was wet it should be replaced. The person I spoke to was of the opinion that the cables would pretty much have to be completely immersed to render them unusable.
my two cents....for what its worth...
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
The question was posed to Southwire and they recommended that if the paper inside the cable assembly was wet it should be replaced.

The person I spoke to was of the opinion that the cables would pretty much have to be completely immersed to render them unusable.
So, which is it? :confused:
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
Items Requiring Complete Replacement:

..?
All dry-type transformers regardless of kVA ratings
..?
All dry type control circuit transformers

Items Which May Possibly be Reconditioned by Trained Personnel in Consultation with
Manufacturer:

..?
Liquid-filled transformers (analysis of the insulating medium is required for evaluation of this

equipment)
..?
Cast-resin transformers


Wire, Cable, and Flexible Cords

When any wire or cable product is exposed to water, any metallic component (such as the
conductor, metallic shield, or armor) is subject to corrosion that can damage the component itself
and/or cause termination failures. If water remains in medium voltage cable, it could accelerate
insulation deterioration, causing premature failure. Wire and cable that is listed for only dry
locations may become a shock hazard, when energized, after being exposed to water.

The following recommended actions are based upon the concept that the water contains no high
concentrations of chemicals, oils, etc. If it is suspected that the water has unusual contaminants,
such as may be found in some flood water, the manufacturer should be consulted before any
decision is made to continue using any wire or cable products.

Items Requiring Complete Replacement:

..?
Any wire or cable that is listed for dry locations only, such as type NM-B cable, should be
replaced if it has been exposed to water.
..?
Any cable that contains fillers, such as polypropylene, paper, etc., should be replaced if the
ends of the product have been exposed to water.

Items Which May Possibly be Reconditioned by Trained Personnel in Consultation with
Manufacturer:

..?
Any wire or cable product that is suitable for wet locations and whose ends have not been
exposed to water should be suitable for use or continued use. A qualified person, such as an
electrical contractor or others familiar with wire and cable terminology, should make the
determination of the product's suitability for wet locations.

..?
Any wire or cable product, not containing fillers, that is suitable for wet locations and whose
ends have been exposed to water, may be considered a candidate for "purging" (using an
inert gas under pressure to remove water contained in the product) under engineering
supervision. If this procedure is employed, the wire or cable should be tested prior to
energization. As a minimum, an insulation resistance test with a megohmmeter should be
conducted.
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
Mac,

Where did that list come from ?


Its a NEMA document, it was too large to post the whole thing, here's more

GUIDELINES FOR
HANDLING
WATER-DAMAGED
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
1300 NORTH 17TH STREET, SUITE 1752
ROSSLYN, VIRGINIA 22209

703 841-3200
703 841-5900 FAX

WWW.NEMA.ORG


Guidelines for Handling
Water-damaged Electrical Equipment

NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER – Please see the last page of this document.

This publication provides guidelines on how to handle electrical equipment that has been
exposed to water through flooding, fire fighting activities, hurricanes, etc. It is designed for use by
suppliers, installers, inspectors, and users of electrical products.

Electrical equipment exposed to water can be extremely dangerous if reenergized without proper
reconditioning or replacement. Reductions in integrity of electrical insulation due to moisture,
debris lodged in the equipment components, and other factors, can damage electrical equipment
by affecting the ability of the equipment to perform its intended function. Damage to electrical
equipment can also result from flood waters contaminated with chemicals, sewage, oil, and other
debris that will affect the integrity and performance of the equipment. Ocean water and salt spray
can be particularly damaging due to the corrosive and conductive nature of the salt water residue.

Distributors of electrical equipment should not use any inventory that has been subjected to water
damage. Damaged inventory should not be sold to resellers that will place the equipment back
into the market. This can lead to damaged equipment still being used and creating a hazard to
individuals or property.

To Contact the Manufacturer

Working knowledge of electrical systems and of the equipment in question is required to evaluate
damage due to contact with water. The original manufacturer of the equipment should be
contacted if any questions arise or specific recommendations are needed. In many cases,
replacement will be necessary.

After consultation with the manufacturer, some larger types of electrical equipment may be reconditioned by properly trained personnel. The ability to recondition the equipment may varywith the nature of the electrical function, the degree of flooding, the age of the equipment, and thelength of time the equipment was exposed to water.

Attempts to recondition equipment without consulting the manufacturer can result in additional
hazards due to the use of improper cleaning agents, which can further damage the equipment
(see National Electrical Code? Section 110-11 FPN No.2) or due to improper reconditioning
techniques.

NEMA member companies are committed to safety. For specific contacts within these
manufacturing firms, call or write:

National Electrical Manufacturers Association
1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752
Rosslyn, Virginia 22209
Telephone: (703) 841-3236
Fax: (703) 841-3336
ATTN: Vince Baclawski
email: vin_baclawski@nema.org


Electrical Distribution Equipment

Electrical distribution equipment usually involves switches and low-voltage protective components
such as molded case circuit breakers and fuses, within assemblies such as enclosures,
panelboards, and switchboards. These assemblies can be connected to electrical distribution
systems using various wiring methods.

The protective components are critical to the safe operation of distribution circuits. Their ability to
protect these circuits is adversely affected by exposure to water and to the minerals and particles
which may be present in the water. In molded case circuit breakers and switches, such exposure
can affect the overall operation of the mechanism through corrosion, through the presence of
foreign particles, and through removal of lubricants. The condition of the contacts can be affected
and the dielectric insulation capabilities of internal materials can be reduced. Further, some
molded case circuit breakers are equipped with electronic trip units and the functioning of these
trip units might be impaired. For fuses, the water may affect the filler material. A damaged filler
material will degrade the insulation and interruption capabilities.

Distribution assemblies contain protective components together with the necessary support
structures, buswork, wiring, electromechanical or electronic relays and meters. Exposure to water
can cause corrosion and insulation damage to all of these areas. In the case of exposure of
distribution assemblies to water, the manufacturer should be contacted before further action is
taken.

Items Which May Possibly Be Reconditioned by Trained Personnel in Consultation with
Manufacturer:

..•
Enclosed switches—reference NEMA Standards Publication KS 1-2001, Enclosed and

Miscellaneous Distribution Equipment Switches (600 Volts Maximum), para 5.1, 5.1.2
..•
Busway—reference NEMA Standards Publication BU 1.1-2000, General Instructions for

Handling, Installation, Operation, and Maintenance of Busway Rated 600 Volts or Less, para

3.4.4, 9.2.4.2
..•
Panelboards—reference Standards Publication ANSI/NEMA PB 1.1-2002, General

Instructions for Proper Installation, Operation, and Maintenance of Panelboards Rated 600

Volts or Less, para. 10.3, 10.8.3, 10.8.4
..•
Switchboards—reference Standards Publication ANSI/NEMA PB 2.1-2002, General

Instructions for Proper Handling, Installation, Operation and Maintenance of Deadfront

Distribution Switchboards Rated 600 Volts or Less, para. 11.3.1.3, 11.10
..•
Fire Pump Controllers—reference NEMA Standards Publication ICS 15-1999 (R2004),

Instructions for the Handling, Installation, Operation, and Maintenance of Electric Fire Pump

Controllers Rated Not More Than 600 V

Transformers

Exposure of transformers to water can cause corrosion and insulation damage to the transformer
core and winding. The ability of the transformer to perform its intended function in a safe manner
can also be impaired by debris and chemicals which may be deposited inside the transformer
during a flood. Water and contaminates also can damage transformer fluids.

Items Requiring Complete Replacement:

..•
All dry-type transformers regardless of kVA ratings
..•
All dry type control circuit transformers

Items Which May Possibly be Reconditioned by Trained Personnel in Consultation with
Manufacturer:

..•
Liquid-filled transformers (analysis of the insulating medium is required for evaluation of this

equipment)
..•
Cast-resin transformers


Wire, Cable, and Flexible Cords

When any wire or cable product is exposed to water, any metallic component (such as the
conductor, metallic shield, or armor) is subject to corrosion that can damage the component itself
and/or cause termination failures. If water remains in medium voltage cable, it could accelerate
insulation deterioration, causing premature failure. Wire and cable that is listed for only dry
locations may become a shock hazard, when energized, after being exposed to water.

The following recommended actions are based upon the concept that the water contains no high
concentrations of chemicals, oils, etc. If it is suspected that the water has unusual contaminants,
such as may be found in some flood water, the manufacturer should be consulted before any
decision is made to continue using any wire or cable products.

Items Requiring Complete Replacement:

..•
Any wire or cable that is listed for dry locations only, such as type NM-B cable, should be
replaced if it has been exposed to water.
..•
Any cable that contains fillers, such as polypropylene, paper, etc., should be replaced if the
ends of the product have been exposed to water.

Items Which May Possibly be Reconditioned by Trained Personnel in Consultation with
Manufacturer:

..•
Any wire or cable product that is suitable for wet locations and whose ends have not been
exposed to water should be suitable for use or continued use. A qualified person, such as an
electrical contractor or others familiar with wire and cable terminology, should make the
determination of the product's suitability for wet locations.

..•
Any wire or cable product, not containing fillers, that is suitable for wet locations and whose
ends have been exposed to water, may be considered a candidate for "purging" (using an
inert gas under pressure to remove water contained in the product) under engineering
supervision. If this procedure is employed, the wire or cable should be tested prior to
energization. As a minimum, an insulation resistance test with a megohmmeter should be
conducted.
 

mj63

Member
The boss decided he really didnt want the liability of putting his name on reusing the wet NM-B even if it was tested, so he gave a price to replace it and explained to the homeowner that there could be problems later due to corrosion.

Thanks for all the replys and info.
 

mj63

Member
One more question about this place, I was going to repull the Cat 5 and the RG-6 when I remembered that alot of the RG-6 I have used was sunlight resistant, I looked at the cable that was installed in this place and it too was sunlight resistant.
I am wondering if that means that the RG-6 might be rated to be in a damp location because of the Sun Res rating?
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
One more question about this place, I was going to repull the Cat 5 and the RG-6 when I remembered that alot of the RG-6 I have used was sunlight resistant, I looked at the cable that was installed in this place and it too was sunlight resistant.
I am wondering if that means that the RG-6 might be rated to be in a damp location because of the Sun Res rating?


Does that mean you are questioning leaving the RG6?,,,,if that's what you're asking I would not leave it.
 
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