Assumptions for future proofing for residential electric car

Merry Christmas

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
But either way how long it takes depends on what rate the charging equipment is capable of and/or limited to where it can be limited for whatever reasons.

I really can’t come up with a good reason to be able to throttle back the EVSE on the fly. The car will control the rate as required up to the what the EVSE allows.

Some have that feature, nonetheless.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I really can’t come up with a good reason to be able to throttle back the EVSE on the fly. The car will control the rate as required up to the what the EVSE allows.

Some have that feature, nonetheless.
40/50 amp circuit @ 240 volts will obviously be able to deliver greater charging rate than 15/20 amp circuit @ 120 volts was main thing I had in mind, granted that may often be a different charging unit.

If the number of EV's does increase to the point we need to control the load on the grid, I can see it being possible to signal the unit to only charge at a certain rate during peak demand periods.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
40/50 amp circuit @ 240 volts will obviously be able to deliver greater charging rate than 15/20 amp circuit @ 120 volts was main thing I had in mind, granted that may often be a different charging unit.

If the number of EV's does increase to the point we need to control the load on the grid, I can see it being possible to signal the unit to only charge at a certain rate during peak demand periods.
How about we just increase generation capacity, like we've been doing for the last 100 years? Of course, if you want reliable power, you'll have to ditch the whirlygigs and solar toys.
 

drcampbell

Senior Member
Location
The Motor City, Michigan USA
Occupation
Engineer
Sure, a grain of salt ...

salt-lick-stone-tied-fence-providing-livestock-sodium-chloride-extra-minerals-73912332.jpg
 

wwhitney

Senior Member
Location
Berkeley, CA
Occupation
Retired
Reality disagrees with you.
Certainly wind was curtailed during the Texas freeze. But wind is known to be an intermittent source, that was not unexpected. While fossil fuel plants are generally thought of as reliable sources. So what was most surprising was how unreliable the fossil fuel plants were during the Texas freeze.

Cheers, Wayne
 
Reality disagrees with you. Watch the blue line...

My point about texas is that they have a significant amount of wind energy in their energy portfolio, despite having a relatively small grid and despite being a red state. Your claim just doesn't hold water. Wind energy was not the cause of the February Texas blackout, everyone knows that. Come on, you are an engineer, you know that snapshot of graph doesn't tell the whole story.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I thought wind power dropped out during the Texas freeze because Texans didn't bother to install the winterizing kits.
There wasn't much wind AFAIK so production would have been low anyway. Not much wind when it went through here, thank god, or wind chill would have been even worse.

I think the biggest problem was natural gas facilities were not designed to operate and never had to before in that cold of conditions, which I believe they had planned to make some upgrades to be able to handle though I don't know how that has progressed.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
My point about texas is that they have a significant amount of wind energy in their energy portfolio, despite having a relatively small grid and despite being a red state. Your claim just doesn't hold water. Wind energy was not the cause of the February Texas blackout, everyone knows that. Come on, you are an engineer, you know that snapshot of graph doesn't tell the whole story.
OK, which part of the story doesn't it tell? The fundamentals are, if there wasn't enough capacity to cover the demand, that was a choice made by regulators, and both political parties, almost 40 year ago when they first gave wind producers a $25/MW-hr tax credit. In order to make life profitable for wind and solar, Texas decided to convert from a capacity market to an energy market. In this model, producers get paid ONLY for what they produce and sell. No one gets paid to have spinning reserve available. If you don't get paid for it, what fool will provide it? Wind and solar can't get any traction in a capacity market because they can't offer the necessary guarantees.
 
OK, which part of the story doesn't it tell? The fundamentals are, if there wasn't enough capacity to cover the demand, that was a choice made by regulators, and both political parties, almost 40 year ago when they first gave wind producers a $25/MW-hr tax credit. In order to make life profitable for wind and solar, Texas decided to convert from a capacity market to an energy market. In this model, producers get paid ONLY for what they produce and sell. No one gets paid to have spinning reserve available. If you don't get paid for it, what fool will provide it? Wind and solar can't get any traction in a capacity market because they can't offer the necessary guarantees.
You are so anti anything with an "R" in it, it's pointless to continue this conversation
 

Open Neutral

Senior Member
Location
Inside the Beltway
Occupation
Engineer
The implementation of fusion power -- which is about eight or ten years away, and has been eight or ten years away ever since November 1, 1952 -- will have no effect on transmission & distribution capacity.

That Depends.
If it's Mr. Fusion on the back of the Delorean...

My Tesla owner friend tells me Musk recently told him that his Model S can now backcharge a Powerwall...
 
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