Carbon Detectors beginning 1/1/11

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renosteinke

Senior Member
Location
NE Arkansas
I don't believe the CO detectors have to be interlinked with anything - and you bring up another point.

The other point is that we need an alarm to tell us WHAT the problem is. It does us no good to just know that some alarm has gone off for something, somewhere. Sort of like running outside, because you confused the 'fire' alarm with the 'tornado coming' alarm. Oops.

For a fire, you want to seal the house, close your doors and windows. For CO, you want to open the place up. You NEED to know what's what.

I think you missed my point, though. CO in another room presents little danger to a sleeping person - but CO in the bedroom is another story. That CO can come from a space heater, the heating system, whatever. With the bedroom door closed, there is every chance that CO levels in the bedroom will be greatly different from levels elsewhere in the house. Placing the CO detector outside a closed bedroom affords the sleeper no protection at all.

That's why I believe that the CO detector mandated are a wrong turn, down a blind alley.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I don't believe the CO detectors have to be interlinked with anything -
Where I am COs must be interlinked with each other and can be separate or connected to the smoke alarms.






The other point is that we need an alarm to tell us WHAT the problem is. It does us no good to just know that some alarm has gone off for something, somewhere. Sort of like running outside, because you confused the 'fire' alarm with the 'tornado coming' alarm. Oops.
'They' do not want you to do anything but evacuate.
 

renosteinke

Senior Member
Location
NE Arkansas
Thank you, Iwire, for the response.

As I was raised, and countless fire drills emphasized, the sounding of the fire drill also brought with it the requirement to shut things off and close up the doors and windows prior to evacuation. This was to inhibit the spread of fire.

With CO, you want to open the doors and windows.

As I see it, there remains a very real need to know what alarm has sounded.
 

Eyeseeitall

Member
Location
Huntley, IL
...there remains a very real need to know what alarm has sounded.
The alarms do make different sounds; being that I test them often, I know which alarm is for which hazard. I believe smoke alarms have a specified alarm sound and CO's have a specified alarm sound- each is distinct / different from the other.
 

Strife

Senior Member
I agree with the first exception.
The second... Seems we're trying to protect suicidal people.
Last major hurricane down here in Miami there were 3 or 4 families that died because they ran a generator from inside the house (Darwin award anyone?) because they were afraid of people stealing it. I can see Florida adopting same kinda rule soon.
Only in America chain saws carry a label stating the chain can cause harm while moving (DUH?).
There's no way we can make something idiot proof.
WHY?
Someone will make a better idiot.


In NC beginning Jan. 1, 2011 all new dewelling units will require a CO detector outside bedroom areas.

The only exception to this - is if dewelling unit has NO fossil fuel appliances and also NO attached garage.

Is this nationally or just NC-- any one know???
 

hurk27

Senior Member
I agree with the first exception.
The second... Seems we're trying to protect suicidal people.
Last major hurricane down here in Miami there were 3 or 4 families that died because they ran a generator from inside the house (Darwin award anyone?) because they were afraid of people stealing it. I can see Florida adopting same kinda rule soon.
Only in America chain saws carry a label stating the chain can cause harm while moving (DUH?).
There's no way we can make something idiot proof.
WHY?
Someone will make a better idiot.
You touched on one of my biggest pet peeves with the way our laws are heading, and where will it stop? when we are all reduced to living in a padded cell?

The more we dumb down safety the more dumber the public gets, the rest gets too political and is not allowed on here, so I'll go back to drawing the schematic for the automated controls for a greenhouse PLC job.:grin:
 

jwjrw

Senior Member
Dennis I did not read the whole thread but, the link you provided talks about landlords and tenants. It also says a battery one would meet code. Sounds like it is not really going to affect us.

I just saw a later post from you with the rule in it. Sorry!
 
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ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
You touched on one of my biggest pet peeves with the way our laws are heading, and where will it stop? when we are all reduced to living in a padded cell?

The more we dumb down safety the more dumber the public gets, the rest gets too political and is not allowed on here, so I'll go back to drawing the schematic for the automated controls for a greenhouse PLC job.:grin:
You're not alone in this.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
I don't believe the CO detectors have to be interlinked with anything - and you bring up another point.

The other point is that we need an alarm to tell us WHAT the problem is. It does us no good to just know that some alarm has gone off for something, somewhere. Sort of like running outside, because you confused the 'fire' alarm with the 'tornado coming' alarm. Oops.

For a fire, you want to seal the house, close your doors and windows. For CO, you want to open the place up. You NEED to know what's what.

I think you missed my point, though. CO in another room presents little danger to a sleeping person - but CO in the bedroom is another story. That CO can come from a space heater, the heating system, whatever. With the bedroom door closed, there is every chance that CO levels in the bedroom will be greatly different from levels elsewhere in the house. Placing the CO detector outside a closed bedroom affords the sleeper no protection at all.

That's why I believe that the CO detector mandated are a wrong turn, down a blind alley.
Fire alarm signals are default temporal 3. CO alarm signals are default temporal 4. Or you get a combo unit from Kidde that says "Fire, fire!!" or "Carbon Monoxide!" depending on the situation.
 

Bill Annett

Senior Member
Location
Wheeling, West Virginia
Occupation
Electrical inspector for the City of Wheeling
In the later part of 2009, The state of WV adopted new codes. One of the codes were the 2009 International Residentila Code (IRC). Section 315 of that code deals with Carbon Monoxide Alarms. The code that we had before did not require them. The city of Wheeling Adopted this code towards the end of December so we are now enforcing this code along with the 2008 NEC.

Bill Annett
 

Terrilee

New member
California July 2011

California July 2011

July 1, 2011 all single family dwellings or new construction with flame burning units in the residence must have a CO detector installed.
 
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