Ceiling projector and nec 400.8 & 400.7

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DOHMER

Member
I am been having a discussion with some of my co-workers about placing a receptacle above a suspended ceiling and then running the projector cord through the mounting tube and plugging it into the receptacle above the ceiling. The projector cord can be unplugged from the back of the projector which would allow it to be easily disconnected and removed for maintenance. I have always taken the stance that plugging a flexible cord into a receptacle above the ceiling for such equipment is not allowed by the code per NEC 400.8 (5). However, I was wondering if 400.7(8) would apply and allow the installation?
 

RICK NAPIER

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
I once had an EE fax me twenty seven pages justfying his design of putting the projector receptacles in the drop ceiling. Every page cords are mentioned in the code and installation instructions for the projector. I called him back and said page two says you can't do it.
 

stew

Senior Member
i have run in to this at times. What I do is run mc cable down to an outlet mounted in the cueiling tile and leave the cord on the outside. not as hidden of course but code compliant nevertheless
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
Okay I agree. But can anybody explain 400.7(8)?
400.7(8) permits an appliance to be cord and plug connected. It does not supersede 400.8(5) though. So the appliance cord can not be installed above a suspended ceiling or pass through the ceiling tile.

Chris
 

muskrat

Member
Location
St. Louis, MO
Have done several....don't have manufact. right now(PM if you want it) but they make a real nice bracket/pipe stub/2X2 panel with KO for mounting box and LV terminations in the face of the panel. Has hardware etc. for neat job.(even used white duplex and plate....sweet)
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Since this is such a common installation method why can't we just remove the prohibition for such things as projectors, security cameras, condensate pumps, etc? IMO the appliance will fail or be changed long before the cord wears out.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
Since this is such a common installation method why can't we just remove the prohibition for such things as projectors, security cameras, condensate pumps, etc? IMO the appliance will fail or be changed long before the cord wears out.
Sounds like a code change proposal.:)

Chris
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Since this is such a common installation method why can't we just remove the prohibition for such things as projectors, security cameras, condensate pumps, etc? IMO the appliance will fail or be changed long before the cord wears out.
Sounds like a code change proposal.:)
I would rather see the manufacturers provide equipment capable of being hardwired instead of opening a door that IMO should remain closed.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
Since this is such a common installation method why can't we just remove the prohibition for such things as projectors, security cameras, condensate pumps, etc? IMO the appliance will fail or be changed long before the cord wears out.
If that was the case then we sould take out all of the sections that mention "unsused opening." since I write this one up way more than I write up a cord above a droped ceiling.

If it's common it must be acceptable?:confused:
 

elohr46

Senior Member
Location
square one
I don't see why it has to be such a big deal to install a recept. flush with or below a dropped ceiling for projectors or cameras, as far as condensate pumps go you can purchase a hard wired model.
 
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