Code violation 314.20

michalspike

Senior Member
I thought I understand it good that this for combustible material only, I thought if your walls are metal studs and sheetrock your box can be set up back more than 1/4 inch.
Is anybody have different opinion.
Is this ring will fix it
Thank you for our help.

shopping.jpg
 

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Location
NW Ohio
Way I understand it is, up to 1/4" if the surrounding material is non-combustible and if combustable then no setback is allowed. Unless you have a method such as your showing to address the issue.
 

al hildenbrand

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
Occupation
Electrical Contractor, Electrical Consultant, Electrical Engineer
I agree with Steve.

Combustible wall surface - the box must be flush or stand proud of the wall (stick out of the wall).

Noncombustible wall surface, the box can be as much as 1/4" behind the finished wall surface. If the box is more than 1/4" behind the finished surface, an extension ring of some sort, or a box extender must cover the gap.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
As mentioned setback no more than 1/4" non-combustible, 0" combustible. The box extenders depicted in the OP will satisfy the code if you're more than 1/4" back from the surface of drywall.
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Note that, with plastic boxes anyway, the cost of those extension rings and original box exceeds the cost of an adjustable box, especially when you consider the extra labor of futzing around with stackers and extra long 6-32 screws to mount your devices.

As others have written, boxes must be flush if the surrounding surface is combustible, like wooden paneling, and may be up to 1/4" inset/recessed from non-combustible wall surfaces like drywall. If you are more than 1/4" recessed, you neeed an extension ring/box extender like you linked.

Zip boxes are quite a bit more than cheapie plastic boxes, tho not a whole lot more than your sturdier, higher ci boxes. Some areas, like kitchen countertop boxes and receptacles in baseboard trim, it works out better in many cases to put in the zip box. What happens when the HO decides to add (or delete) a tile backsplash, or orders bb trim a different thickness than what you planned for? With a zip box, that inset or poking out box is fixed in 3 seconds for no additional cost on your end.

eta: stud type has no bearing on 314.20; it is only the wall finish that matters.
 
Last edited:

augie47

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee
That's why I use the plastic ones by Arlington.
:thumbsup:

The "adjustable" boxes have not become popular here and Mr. Arlington should have been able to purchase a new car based on sales in this area due to the popularity of walls/ceilings finished with 3/4 thick lumber.

 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
That's why I use the plastic ones by Arlington.
Same here hence my link to them. :)



:thumbsup:

The "adjustable" boxes have not become popular here and Mr. Arlington should have been able to purchase a new car based on sales in this area due to the popularity of walls/ceilings finished with 3/4 thick lumber.

Madison and Carlon make em too, even in steel. I find them anytime wall, ceiling, or floor detail is subject to change-exterior ceilings with furring strips also come to mind. Its often not worth my time to try to track down what kind of wall board, paneling, etc will be used, or redo boxes because of a change order.
 

Strathead

Senior Member
My inspectors have always required it. Used those ground clip dohickies. I suppose one could say that the metal to metal contact of a device to the extension ring satisfied bonding requirements, but it was easier to comply.
I respectfully disagree for mostly annecdotal reasons. First They are grounded via the screw and the contact with the yoke of the receptacle or the switch. Second, that method of grounding was allowed until the early 90's even for receptacles. Third, the metal isn't even exposed, as it is covered by a plate. Fourth, if you need to run a supplemental ground those then by extension wouldn't you need to also run a supplemental ground to a stainless steel cover plate.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I respectfully disagree
And I will repectfully disagree for my own reasons.

First They are grounded via the screw and the contact with the yoke of the receptacle or the switch.
Maybe, and that connection alone is not allowable for devices unless extra parts are added to make them 'self grounding' so why would it be acceptable for these rings?

Second, that method of grounding was allowed until the early 90's even for receptacles.
But it is not any longer.

Third, the metal isn't even exposed, as it is covered by a plate.
So we don't have to ground say boxes, EMT, RMC, MC armor that are hidden inside walls?


Fourth, if you need to run a supplemental ground those then by extension wouldn't you need to also run a supplemental ground to a stainless steel cover plate.
One is a loose connection the other is not.
 

Knuckle Dragger

Master Electrician Electrical Contractor 01752
Location
Marlborough, Massachusetts USA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Note that, with plastic boxes anyway, the cost of those extension rings and original box exceeds the cost of an adjustable box, especially when you consider the extra labor of futzing around with stackers and extra long 6-32 screws to mount your devices.

As others have written, boxes must be flush if the surrounding surface is combustible, like wooden paneling, and may be up to 1/4" inset/recessed from non-combustible wall surfaces like drywall. If you are more than 1/4" recessed, you neeed an extension ring/box extender like you linked.

Zip boxes are quite a bit more than cheapie plastic boxes, tho not a whole lot more than your sturdier, higher ci boxes. Some areas, like kitchen countertop boxes and receptacles in baseboard trim, it works out better in many cases to put in the zip box. What happens when the HO decides to add (or delete) a tile backsplash, or orders bb trim a different thickness than what you planned for? With a zip box, that inset or poking out box is fixed in 3 seconds for no additional cost on your end.

eta: stud type has no bearing on 314.20; it is only the wall finish that matters.
Adjustables are great until the insulators install the closed cell foam around it.
I still find them helpful in kitchens and bathrooms.until then
 
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