Construction Site Temporary Lighting in a Confined Space

TVH

Member
We all know that on a construction site that receptacles are not permitted to be placed on a branch circuit that supplies temporary lighting (NEC 590.4(D)(1).
QUESTION: Is it permitted to plug in temporary lighting into a standard (non lighting, receptacle) to supply temporary lighting for a confined space or other situation?
In my view, I believe any lighting circuit should be on a separate branch circuit for safety reasons and I believe that Article 590 would support this.

Comments appreciated.
 

MAC702

Senior Member
Location
Clark County, NV
As soon as temporary lighting is plugged in, that becomes a receptacle on a branch circuit supplying temporary lighting.

Exact definitions of construction site and temporary lighting may be more critical to the discussion.
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
What are we talking about here, like an elevator pit? There is more than article 590 here, and while OSHA does follow the NEC in this matter, confined space rules are going to come into play if you have power in the pit, and if the elevator cab is already installed.

In any event, 590.4 (D) disallows the installation. the moment that light is plugged in, you now have a branch circuit supplying temporary lighting with a receptacle on it.

Eta: sorry Mac702, I echoed your post almost to the point of plagiarism. I agree with your interpretation.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Confined space issues IDK, NEC doesn't address confined space issues anyway those are OSHA issues.

But I have often wondered myself about temporary lighting and receptacles supplying it.

I don't know that they intended such requirements to apply to lighting that is cord and plug connected, but maybe is not worded so well if that is the intent. Otherwise all cord connected work lights would need to be plugged into a dedicated circuit with no other outlets. My guess is the intention is that no "fixed" temporary lighting be on same circuit as a receptacle outlet.
 

TVH

Member
Confined space issues IDK, NEC doesn't address confined space issues anyway those are OSHA issues.

But I have often wondered myself about temporary lighting and receptacles supplying it.

I don't know that they intended such requirements to apply to lighting that is cord and plug connected, but maybe is not worded so well if that is the intent. Otherwise all cord connected work lights would need to be plugged into a dedicated circuit with no other outlets. My guess is the intention is that no "fixed" temporary lighting be on same circuit as a receptacle outlet.

All replies make sense. Thank you.
 

TVH

Member
I don't have the NEC with me, but in my opinion, task lighting (e.g confined space) should be allowed to be plugged into a general purpose receptacle.

Faults from electrical tools/equipment/ventilation equipment that are plugged into a general purpose receptacle along with temporary lighting could trip the circuit leaving persons in the dark. This would be a hazard, especially in a confined space.
 

MAC702

Senior Member
Location
Clark County, NV
Task lighting and egress lighting are two different things. Egress lighting might need to be protected in ways that task lighting does not need. Hence the mention of knowing exact definitions of these for the question. Both may very well not be permanent, but only one might meet the application of "temporary lighting."

I know you are talking about temp lighting here but... should all lighting be on its own circuits rather than allowed to be wired on outlet circuits, and why?
I underlined the key part of your question. Depending on the installation, yes, it can be a very good idea to have lighting be dedicated to a circuit less likely to be overloaded.

But should it be required by Code/law for all installations?

Think about a circuit going to a more isolated area that needs to have lights and receptacles. Now you are going to be required to run two circuits out there even if you know you'll never need that much power.
 

Adamjamma

Senior Member
but, that is one reason I asked. I usually run lights and outlets separate but, have had customers that wanted to have bedrooms set up where they can switch off one breaker and turn off both lights and outlets in the room... mainly guest rooms and often after all the kids have moved out... they basically want to be able to switch it off and know it wont simply be switched on by a cleaner and left on, using up their very little retirement checks.

I never really gave it a load of thought other than the what if the breaker cuts off because of too many things plugged in... run a 20 amp circuit, put the four or five outlets and the cieling fan and light all on it... customer is happy...

But, should I insist on keeping lighting and outlets separate on all circuits? I mean, I see it no different than if they had no lights but had lightswitch controlled outlets... with floor lamps...
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I know you are talking about temp lighting here but... should all lighting be on its own circuits rather than allowed to be wired on outlet circuits, and why?
IMO this should never be an NEC requirement at least as some sort of general rule. Only or specific situations, and even those should maybe be covered more by other codes more so than NEC. Such requirement goes against 90.1, as does many things already in the NEC.
 

TVH

Member
We all know that on a construction site that receptacles are not permitted to be placed on a branch circuit that supplies temporary lighting (NEC 590.4(D)(1).
QUESTION: Is it permitted to plug in temporary lighting into a standard (non lighting, receptacle) to supply temporary lighting for a confined space or other situation?
In my view, I believe any lighting circuit should be on a separate branch circuit for safety reasons and I believe that Article 590 would support this.

Comments appreciated.
The drop cord shown in the attachment has a receptacle for powering other equipment such as electrical tools and equipment. If this lighting unit is the primary source for light inside a confined space (vessel, drum, tank, pipe, etc. ) on a construction site then it seems to violate NEC 590.4(D) which prohibits any receptacle on branch circuits that supply temporary lighting on construction sites. Is this statement correct? If not please explain. I have seen many such arrangements on construction sites and have struggled with supervsion to ensure temporary lighting is provided on a dedicated brach circuit.


Electrical faults from other electrical equipment from other electrical equipment could trip the circuit and leave workers in the dark leading to other hazards.
 

Attachments

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Trouble lamps, or fixtures like you provided a picture to, are not going to fly on a commercial or industrial site. They are a clear violation of 590.4 (D).

However, if said light is plugged into a receptacle, and that light is not part of the temporary lighting, then it is basically just an illuminated extension cord.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Having "temporary lighting" isn't a requirement of NEC. How you install it is covered though.

Just my assumption but OSHA maybe would have general lighting requirements and situations that could be covered with temporary luminaires. Certain task lighting situations may not be part of the general lighting requirements and could be with portable hand held style luminaires.
 
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