does every component going to Canada need to be cUL?

emiller233

Senior Member
Location
pittsburgh, pa
if you ship an assembly to Canada, is it mandatory that every electrical component have the CSA or cUL stamp on it?
for example, many devices used in the USA do not have any kind of certification(ULr, ect), but are still used very regularly in the USA without any issues....

it is just a few pressure transmitters mounted onto a manifold (for the end user to wire/install)
 
My understanding is it does not necessarily have to be cUL. There are several different approvals recognized here in Canada.

That being said, it must have one of those approvals to be installed in Canada.

Had an inspector ask us for paperwork to prove fuse reducers (of all things) are approved in Canada. They only had a UL stamp on them.

A cUL or CSA is the most common.

I may be wrong. Someone else may know better.

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Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
My understanding is it does not necessarily have to be cUL. There are several different approvals recognized here in Canada.

That being said, it must have one of those approvals to be installed in Canada.

Had an inspector ask us for paperwork to prove fuse reducers (of all things) are approved in Canada. They only had a UL stamp on them.

A cUL or CSA is the most common.

I may be wrong. Someone else may know better.

Sent from my SM-G973W using Tapatalk
That's essentially correct. Here in the US, NRTL (Nationally Recognized Testing Lab) listing is not absolutely required, it's a State-x-State issue. But Canada requires it everywhere; CSA or cUL (or now, cULus). One thing that is different though; CSA is (IMHO) a lot less difficult to work with on getting "field certification" of things that show up without it.
 
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