Dual Function Breaker requirements

Nacho

Member
Location
St. Louis, Mo
With the 2014 Code calling for AFCI's in every location and the emergence of Dual function breakers, where and/or what do they not need to be on? I ask because I questioned an inspector and he wouldn't answer. I'm in my case referring to Furnace circuit, Condenser unit circuit, Washer circuit, dryer circuit, fridge, Dish washer, stove in perticular. But for the sake of generality all the basic dedicated circuits. If so, Why and if not why? As a reference here's my layout. Washer, dryer, furnace and water heater are below grade (basement) on exterior walls. Furnace is inches from water heater and washer is next to dryer.
 
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u791262

Member
2014 NEC, Section 210.12 (A) refers to "all 120V, single phase, 15 & 20A branch circuits and then gives a list of specific dwelling unit rooms. Notice that garages & unfinished basements (even bathrooms) are not mentioned.
 

Nacho

Member
Location
St. Louis, Mo
Correct. This I understand. But say for now, in my case I have a furnace 120V in a basement. Since the location is a basement I would think it should be GFCI protected. And to protect the wiring to the furnace, I would think it should be AFCI protected to. So would there be any reason not to put a furnace on a dual function breaker? Thus conforming to the 2017 code. (At least round here)
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Correct. This I understand. But say for now, in my case I have a furnace 120V in a basement. Since the location is a basement I would think it should be GFCI protected. And to protect the wiring to the furnace, I would think it should be AFCI protected to. So would there be any reason not to put a furnace on a dual function breaker? Thus conforming to the 2017 code. (At least round here)
Not very often would the furnace require AFCI or GFCI.

Dual function is simply a convenience and usually less cost than providing both protection types with separate devices though.
 

u791262

Member
Now we have switched from using the 2014 NEC to the 2017 NEC, not that I think it makes that much difference in this case. 1st, I would assume since it is a furnace it would be hard-wired. The GFCI requirement for residential applications deals with RECEPTACLE OUTLETS. 2nd, Section 210.12(A) of the 2017 NEC does not mention Arc-fault protection for unfinished basements. But nothing prevents you form using a Dual function breaker if you want.
 
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