Dwelling Outlet Placement

I am roughing in area that is considered " living area in a dwelling " which must comply with the 6 ft then 12 ft spacing for outlet placement. Two 3 ft long walls were added perpendicular to one outside wall to enclose an area with a water supply and a floor drain for " dog washing ". The walls are only 4 ft high. with the addition of these wall are they counted as wall space for outlet placement.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
IMO yes. Same thing would apply to a knee wall that was used to separate two spaces.
 

Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
I would say yes due to having a similar experience. However, if you have receptacle(s) on the outside wall that would fit within the 6' rule you wouldn't need to add any. Example: a receptacle within 3' of the new corner would give you the 6' if you count the 3' for the new wall.

Edit, the fact that it has a drain and would be a wash area, the space might not be "livable", but an inspector might see it otherwise and require GFCI protection.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
If it were my call, I'd say receptacles only on the dry side of the short walls, and none in the wet area.
There you go apply common sense to the installation. :D IMO the NEC hasn't caught up to adding common sense in a dog washing area and the wall space in that area would still count.
 
Thanks to all who responded. My area has adopted the 2017 NEC so I will be using combo arc Fault/GFCI circuit breakers to feed this circuit. To clarify my original post please see the attached picture. The two knee walls were added after I roughed in the outer wall creating more than 6 ft to the first outlet.
 

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Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
We can all give you our opinions, and have, but your best bet would be to call the inspector and explain to him or buy a consult permit and let him come look. He might have mercy on you.
But to be honest, it wouldn't be that hard to add receptacles. Be kind of silly to require any on the wet side of the wall, but who knows what an inspector might want.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Thanks to all who responded. My area has adopted the 2017 NEC so I will be using combo arc Fault/GFCI circuit breakers to feed this circuit. To clarify my original post please see the attached picture. The two knee walls were added after I roughed in the outer wall creating more than 6 ft to the first outlet.
I see this no different than a permanent cabinet for say a wet bar, dining room buffet, entertainment center, etc. The floor line is interrupted by something other than ordinary wall, need a receptacle within 6 feet both directions from this object as the 6-12 rule starts over at each side. Side of this object may in some cases be considered ordinary wall.

You could build the same thing all the way to ceiling and put a door on it and it doesn't really change the required outlets, closets are built like that quite often and outlet spacing requirements starts over at each side of the door.
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
I would just add a receptacle in the middle of the right knee wall probably on the left side of the center stud and call it a day. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes- pull the wire back, add a new length.

Looks like the one on the left is ok as is.

-Hal
 

five.five-six

Senior Member
Location
california
I don’t know the exception but I have worked on many custom residences with well over 12’ of walls inside the shower. I’m sure your application would fall under that exception.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I don’t know the exception but I have worked on many custom residences with well over 12’ of walls inside the shower. I’m sure your application would fall under that exception.
The shower is a space that doesn't require receptacles, your 6-12 rule starts over on each side of the opening to the shower.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
I know they make floor drain units for mop closets, but it seems like too small an area to contain a frisky dog, a shower on a hose, and a somewhat soaked human! Are you sure it shouldn't be a larger area?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I know they make floor drain units for mop closets, but it seems like too small an area to contain a frisky dog, a shower on a hose, and a somewhat soaked human! Are you sure it shouldn't be a larger area?
Maybe it is intended for those small breeds that fit in a purse?

that said it could have a closed door and the human reaches over top of walls to wash the dog, biggest problem there is most dogs will shake the water off at some point at very least when all done, some may travel upward and over the walls when this happens.
 
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