Electrical contracting license or Certificate of Registration to Practice as a Qualified Journeyman Electrician in NJ?

SuburbanSparky

New User
Location
NJ
Occupation
Electrician
I might have a few small rez jobs lined up in NJ and I'm not entirely sure which would the best option. Can I pull permits for these jobs with just a certificate or should I go for the license?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
You need both a valid NJ electrical contractors license and an active business permit. Anything short of that and you cannot file for a permit for the jobs.

Welcome to the Forum. :)
 

ramsy

Owner/Operator
Location
LA basin, CA
Occupation
Service Electrician 2017 NEC
I might have a few small rez jobs lined up in NJ and I'm not entirely sure which would the best option. Can I pull permits for these jobs with just a certificate or should I go for the license?
Beware of independent-contractor laborers doing it illegally, with Owner/Builder permits, or a combination of both.

Building departments demand indemnity from all liability with owner/builders, or refuse electrical permits entirely. Owners can hire fully qualified & insured electricians for that part of the job.

Unfortunately, if remodel GC or laborers are begging to do the electrical, owners tend to relent. When properties are sold: with kitchen & bath remodel electrical done by the painters, most fire-hazard wiring is not recognized by typical appraisers or Home inspectors; until either a qualified person inspects it, an insurance claim, or the fire marshal gets involved. When the title company / mortgage insurance institutional stop gaps fails, properly owners are liable for all losses. So, banks don't need AHJ's to inspect propery sales, and few house flippers would pass inspection with AHJ's.

It doesn't help that standards for "Qualified Person" vary between States. The last JW from Jersey that posted a similar question, was not interested in the limited-electrical license that many States define. A limited or un-licensed minor-work exception to licensing, usually excludes remodels or construction entirely.

Rather than let limited licenses go bankrupt all at once with construction, it requires years to develop a client base with enough minor-service volume to realize you can't make a living with a limited license.

However, many construction folks don't have the patients to get an AFCI working, much less repair fire-hazard wiring, and licensed contractors don't believe anyone doing electrical without a State license is qualified to do so, and in my State will make sure those advertising without a license are called to sting projects, by our State Wide Investigative Fraud Team.
 
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