Field engineering

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Cow

Senior Member
Location
Eastern Oregon
I was just thinking how much it would of sucked to solder the new ones in, just to have them blow again...

I guess then he could solder a piece of steel to the front to take care of that...
 

jumper

Senior Member
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Jraef

Moderator
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Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
The original fuses were rejection type, the little teats on the end have to go into the clip to make contact. The replacements were not rejection type and without the teats they will not work. So he soldered the new fuses onto the old blown fuse carcasses so they would make the connection. I've had to do that myself as a temporary fix on motor starter CPT primary fuses, hopefully he ordered the correct fuses and left instructions on replacing them.

When down time is costing someone thousands of dollars an hour and they ordered the wrong fuses, another day of not working drives a lot of ingenuity.
 

infinity

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Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Jraef nailed it. The new fuses wouldn't fit due to the rejection feature so he had to improvise.
 

broadgage

Senior Member
Location
London, England
Am I seeing this right?

The fuses are soldered in?
I dont think that the fuses are soldered into the fuseholders.
It would appear that correct replacement fuses were not to hand, and that the replacements were too big to fit the fuseholder. Therefore the new larger fuses have been soldered to the old, presumably blown, ones.

This might be just barely acceptable in an emergency if the replacement fuses were correctly rated for the application.
Unfortunatly it would appear that the new fuses are 30 amp, replacing 8 amp, and also of a lower voltage rating.
 

Barndog

Senior Member
Location
Spring Creek Pa
I dont think that the fuses are soldered into the fuseholders.
It would appear that correct replacement fuses were not to hand, and that the replacements were too big to fit the fuseholder. Therefore the new larger fuses have been soldered to the old, presumably blown, ones.

This might be just barely acceptable in an emergency if the replacement fuses were correctly rated for the application.
Unfortunatly it would appear that the new fuses are 30 amp, replacing 8 amp, and also of a lower voltage rating.
Either way looks like a hack job. He could of changed out the fuse block very easily or went a got new fuses. and I wouldnt be so sure the other fuses behind are blown. If he would do that work i wouldnt put anything past him
 
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