Fixture Install

horsegoer

Senior Member
For those who estimate how do you approach laboring fixtures mounted on high ceiling? Say above 15’ working off lift. Do you apply labor factor/increase labor?
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
I would simply assign a time allowance per light, to include any furniture moving, as well as time on the lift, plus the lift rental itself.
 

horsegoer

Senior Member
I would simply assign a time allowance per light, to include any furniture moving, as well as time on the lift, plus the lift rental itself.
Yes list etc. is always figured. Just more time consuming depending how many fixture you can get on lift and going up/down on lift more time than working off ladder.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Are you thinking that the lift is faster or slower than using ladder?
Some lifts allow the lift to move when the platform is elevated...

"Working Safely with Scissor Lifts" https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3842.pdf

Moving while elevated http://www.stevenstlaurent.com/scissor-lift-how-high-can-i-be-to-move-it/
  1. "The height must be no greater than 2 times the width of the base. (The height-to-base width ratio of the scaffold during movement is two to one or less, unless the scaffold is designed and constructed to meet or exceed nationally recognized stability test requirements.)
"In other words if all of these requirements are not met, then just get down, then move the scaffold and finally go back to do your work. So as a general rule with a scissor lift, anytime you move it you should lower the lift all the way (or at least lower than 2 times the width of the base. So if your scissor lift is 4-feet wide, then the platform must be lower than 8 feet in order to move it."​
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
A lift, especially when raising materials, is way faster and safer.

Regardless of speed, I'll take a lift over a ladder for almost any work.
 

pjones

Member
I’ve found lifts to be faster. Consider the time it takes to move and setup a 12’ ladder plus haul up and down materials, reposition, go back down for a tool that you couldn’t carry up with the materials,... now repeat for every fixture.

With a platform you can load multiple tools and fixtures then simply drive to the next when done. Platform is large enough you probably don’t need to reposition during install, you just extend the platform and slide over to the other side.

In our area the lift delivery is done without the need of having a tech on site and the tech returns the lift to where it was dropped off when they are done so setup is minimal.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Eddie702

Senior Member
For me hanging fixtures is one of my least favorite jobs. But, usually the first one (for example )takes 25 min the next 20 min then your doing the rest in 15 min theres a learning curve r to everything......at least for me.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
For me hanging fixtures is one of my least favorite jobs. But, usually the first one (for example )takes 25 min the next 20 min then your doing the rest in 15 min theres a learning curve r to everything......at least for me.
The learning curve gets remarkably less steep when you finally read the fine manual! "Oh! You put the base plate up and THEN you install the driver!"
 

cdslotz

Senior Member
It's easy to factor labor up or down on common fixtures (cans, troffers,etc) and adjust the labor due to height or lift/ladder (which I never do).
I would do it usually on the final summary, not as I takeoff.
But the kind of jobs the OP bids are usually large commercial jobs. Just about every job nowadays have new light fixtures no one has ever seen before, much less have any history on the labor to install them. All you can do is look at data sheets, discuss with field, and take your best educated guess.
This is why it is so important to look at material/labor ratios before putting your profit on the bottom line.....to minimize your labor risk.

This is exactly why we mark up fixtures!
 
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