FL contractors exam

anthonysolino

Senior Member
hey every one, just looking for a little input, currently studying for my exam on the 17th I am currently on NFPA 72 I have mikes home study guide. my question is there is over 100 questions being asked in my study guide in relation to 72 I am not taking a specialized alarm contractor license, however I am taking the unlimited exam, does any one have any tips on this? do I really need to FULLY understand the entire book or is just understanding how to navigate it more important the exam states there will be only 14-16 questions related to alarm/limited energy my exam is 100 questions 5 hours it just seems like a lot of wasted time on one document for studying purposes. I could understand if I was taking alarm only then maybe the studying would be different I hope I worded this well enough for some one to understand what I am getting at! 😁

Just to give an idea my approach is I am using the 224 question answer key and going back to the questions and filling in the answers then when I am done I am going back and reading the questions with the answers filled in this seems to be the most efficient way I would spend days in 72 finding all the answers.

any input will be awesome.
 
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Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
I am basing my answer on what I learned when taking the exam in 2014. Things may have changed.

Yes, there is a giant stack of reference books and questions can come from any of them. The rough percentage of questions from each reference is stated on the test website. My approach was familiarize myself with each reference's table of contents and index (if it had those) so that I could quickly look up an answer. I also quickly skimmed each reference stopping only to read things I found interesting. (I read a lot about neon signs.)

As far as studying and taking practice tests, I spent the vast majority of my time on the NEC learning to do the calculations and how to select things from tables. Mike's study guides were key here. There were a few references from which I expected at most one question. I spent almost no time studying those.

The passing grade is 70% and they don't give you your grade unless you fail. This demotivated me to try and score 100%. I should also mention that I made the decision to test after a layoff and did not attempt to get another job, I just studied off and on for three months, probably more time than most people spend preparing. The tests went smoothly and I felt well prepared.
 
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Gary11734

Senior Member
Location
Florida
It can't hurt to get the NFPA72 book. I've taken nine state masters exams (Contractors) in the last five years, and Mike's books were sufficient to pass them all.
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
I took the Georgia exam, which reciprocated to Florida, so I believe it’s basically the same test.

Knowing where to find answers is the key to passing. I bought a tabbed book; you can buy the index tabs yourself and add them to your code book. That helped me tremendously.

In Georgia is was given in two 4 hour parts. The guy sitting next to me had every book on the list and did not finish the first half as he was spending so much time flipping pages looking for answers. I doubt he finished the second half in time.


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hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
I took the Georgia exam, which reciprocated to Florida, so I believe it’s basically the same test.

Knowing where to find answers is the key to passing. I bought a tabbed book; you can buy the index tabs yourself and add them to your code book. That helped me tremendously.

In Georgia is was given in two 4 hour parts. The guy sitting next to me had every book on the list and did not finish the first half as he was spending so much time flipping pages looking for answers. I doubt he finished the second half in time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I agree, but also some states do not allow tabs. Some they supply you with a code book because they don’t want you using notes.
 

Bigwire

Member
Location
West coast
Occupation
Electrician
5 hours x 60 minutes= 300 min

300 min / 100 questions =3 min per question.

Order a stop watch with a count down timer.

Then go find more code questions. Like hundreds and hundreds more code questions.

It really should not take more than one or two minutes to answer a code question.

Just start doing questions when the count down timer rings at 2min30sec put a red mark on that question and move on. Grade yourself that way first.

You should be able to look up easy code questions in less than one minute.

Hard questions with equations and looking things up in tables should take 2min30sec.

Remember strong like bull smart like tractor.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I got the most help from Jeff Rodriguez about 25 years ago. (RIP) I did the NC and SC. They reciprocate now..
He didn’t teach questions, he taught the book.
By that I mean he taught the structure of the book and how to find the answers, while never going to the index. That was a no-no...

learn the headings and structure. (220 services, 225 outside branch circuits, etc...) then when you get asked a question, you know where to turn to to answer the question. Jeff also always started the class with range calculations. I remember I had three or four questions regarding range calcs.

you make the most time up on straight look up questions if you know where to go.
 
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