Fluke Meter

FaradayFF

Senior Member
Location
California
Hi Guys,
How does a Fluke meter work when measuring insulation resistance? Does it apply a certain test voltage and measure the return current to calculate the resultant resistance value? Looking through the Fluke 1587 specs, I see that "output" voltage on the meter is up to 1000Volts. How can that be? The Fluke meter uses (4) AA type batteries - how can it generate such a high voltage? Would 1000V be the maximum voltage that the meter is designed to measure?
Thank you for your feedback.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
I didnt trust that type of fluke insulation tester over using a hand crank meager. But once I used the fluke, and it was a DVM as well, the meager was put on the shelf
How does it work? Likely a dc to dc converter.
 

gar

Senior Member
Location
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Occupation
EE
220920-2233 edt

FaradayFF:

It is simply a result of v = K*N* dPhi/dt.

How does a typical automotive ignition system work? I would think that electricians would be taught some of these basics.

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How does a Fluke meter work when measuring insulation resistance? Does it apply a certain test voltage and measure the return current to calculate the resultant resistance value? Looking through the Fluke 1587 specs, I see that "output" voltage on the meter is up to 1000Volts. How can that be? The Fluke meter uses (4) AA type batteries - how can it generate such a high voltage? Would 1000V be the maximum voltage that the meter is designed to measure?
Quite well.
Yes.
A voltage multiplier.
The same voltage multiplier.
Probably, but an insulation tester isn't measuring voltage, it's measuring current (question #2).

Fluke probably has a white paper or something that explains things.
 

garbo

Senior Member
Hi Guys,
How does a Fluke meter work when measuring insulation resistance? Does it apply a certain test voltage and measure the return current to calculate the resultant resistance value? Looking through the Fluke 1587 specs, I see that "output" voltage on the meter is up to 1000Volts. How can that be? The Fluke meter uses (4) AA type batteries - how can it generate such a high voltage? Would 1000V be the maximum voltage that the meter is designed to measure?
Thank you for your feedback.
Before I retired I used a Fluke 1587 combination VOM/ Megger dozens of times a week performing PM'S on over 500 drives & starters. Not sure how they produce the several test voltage ranges ( 250,500,1,000 Volts DC ) . Great Megger. Our shop had a few Greenlee Meggers that I never liked. I own a 40 year old Simpson Megger that supplies up to 5,000 Volts DC from 4 or maybe 6 D batteries. Found a grounded 4,160 motor with it. The Fluke 1587 is expensive ( think now over $850 ) but rather only carry 1 meter rather then a separate Megger & VOM especially up ladders & roofs. Wish I had a dollar every time it got knocked off a 6' step.ladder. Only negative thing is if the 1,000 volt fuse blows you get a crazy Megger reading It's been 4 years since I retired so having trouble remembering exactly what the reading was.Not sure what the maximum voltage reading is but have measured the 650 to 675 Volts DC Buss voltage on 480 Volt drives thousands of time. We had several AHCU units with two separate enclosures with 100 & 125 HP and a 75HP return fan. If the return fan shut down it would run in reverse at a fairly good speed causing the DC Buss voltage to be over 720 Volts DC. Measured that several times with this best in class meter.
 
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