Forced air heater RFI-D amperage?

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
This information is basically what I received. Forced air heater RFI-D. What would be the amperage of the unit? Would the kw include the fan motor. Will call Dimplex tomorrow to see if I can get some information but thought I would ask here. Info from the internet says 1125w - 8000w. voltages 208,240,277,341,600. I'm pretty sure I will be using 240v. What would the amperage be for 208/240v ? I'm pretty sure it will be less than 33.33 @ 8000w watts. Thank you.
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
Am I right to think that this heater is between 38.44 ohms and 45 ohms? Which would make the amperage at 208v 5.41 amps and at 240v 6.24 amps? That can't be right.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
This information is basically what I received. Forced air heater RFI-D. What would be the amperage of the unit? Would the kw include the fan motor. Will call Dimplex tomorrow to see if I can get some information but thought I would ask here. Info from the internet says 1125w - 8000w. voltages 208,240,277,341,600. I'm pretty sure I will be using 240v. What would the amperage be for 208/240v ? I'm pretty sure it will be less than 33.33 @ 8000w watts. Thank you.
My guess is you got that from a page describing the entire product line and not a description of an individual model.

Home Depot page you gave us tells me you have a unit rated for 3000 watts at 240 volts. This is likely just the heat element rating, the fan is typically such a small load in comparison it can be ignored, maybe around 50 VA max?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Even thinking 10's on a 20 amp
I generally wouldn't, some those just are too crowded in the connection compartment for #10 conductors, if you plan to ever need over 3800 watt unit then maybe do it. If supplying with 208 volts, it will be less current/less watts and would be able to be handled by 14 AWG 240 volt rating of 3000 watts is barely over having 14 AWG allowed.
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
ok thank you. Reading in 424, I believe I can run a 20 amp circuit with 12's (Heater 12.5 plus motor .5 total load continuous 13 amps, @125% = 16.25 total) this heater is in a school. I'm considering the thermostat in the field as the service disconnect (424.19)(424.20) I'm thinking a lockout on the breaker (110.5) wouldn't be a bad idea but from reading 424.19 (C)(4) it doesn't look like it's required on the branch circuit breaker. Or is the lockout required because of 424.19 and 424.19(B) ? Thinking a lock out is required. Thank you
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
ok thank you. Reading in 424, I believe I can run a 20 amp circuit with 12's (Heater 12.5 plus motor .5 total load continuous 13 amps, @125% = 16.25 total) this heater is in a school. I'm considering the thermostat in the field as the service disconnect (424.19)(424.20) I'm thinking a lockout on the breaker (110.5) wouldn't be a bad idea but from reading 424.19 (C)(4) it doesn't look like it's required on the branch circuit breaker. Or is the lockout required because of 424.19 and 424.19(B) ? Thinking a lock out is required. Thank you
Unit switch or thermostat within sight that breaks all supply lines and has a positive "off" position and can not automatically operate when in this position is acceptable disconnecting means.

Note service disconnect is improper terminology and would apply to disconnect for the service conductors from the utility company
 
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