Funeral Home

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
I know you are all dying to answer this question.... (comical drum roll)

Anyone know of any odd ball codes for a funeral home's morgue? Looking at building codes and NEC, I don't see anything that makes a morgue special, but I thought I would ask incase someone has experience.

Thanks all.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Nothing specific to this sort of place (like a section in chapter 5 or 6.)

Could encounter specific locations that have specific rules though.

GFCI requirements would be to protect the living not the dead.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
The SDS gives it a "4" on the NFPA flammability part of the hazard diamond and cautions "Burns readily. Rapidly or completely vaporizes at atmospheric pressure and normal ambient temperature. [emphasis added]"

That one shows a flash point of 140°F, so it does not completely vaporize at normal ambient temperatures...it can't even give off enough flammable vapors at normal ambient temperatures to support combustion.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
That one shows a flash point of 140°F, so it does not completely vaporize at normal ambient temperatures...it can't even give off enough flammable vapors at normal ambient temperatures to support combustion.
The flash point is relevant for exposure to hot surfaces. It will completely volatilize at room temperature, with a explosive range of 7-73% in air, almost the same range as hydrogen (4-75%). The question is what strength is usually stored at the funeral home.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
The flash point is relevant for exposure to hot surfaces. It will completely volatilize at room temperature, with a explosive range of 7-73% in air, almost the same range as hydrogen (4-75%). The question is what strength is usually stored at the funeral home.
The flash point is relevant no matter what the temperature source is because if the liquid is below that temperature it cannot give off vapors fast enough to support combustion . I guess if there is no ventilation, you might reach the LEL,

The STEL is 2ppm so I would never expect the 7000 ppm required to reach the LEL.

OSHA says the IDLH concentration is 100 ppm., and NISOH says it is 20 ppm. They also say the LC50 is less than 1000 ppm, so unlikely the vapor concentration would be anywhere near the LEL in a funeral home.

I don't see it being a classified area.
 
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