Holmes on Homes:

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charlie b

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Location
Seattle, WA
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Electrical Engineer
I am a big fan of that show. There is a HOH coffee cup on my shelf at work.

I have never seen an episode in which the homeowner told the contractor not to bother with permits. It is always the other way around: the contractor (who winds up doing a bad and incomplete job at an elevated price) tells the HO that they don't need no stinkin' permits. Mike Holmes grew up as a carpenter, I believe, and he does a good deal of the physical labor related to that profession. But he always brings in professionals to do the other trade work, such as HVAC, electrical, concrete, roofing, structural engineers, and landscaping. He urges the viewers to use professional with well established reputations.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
I am not a huge fan of the show. I watched it a few times. I think he is full of himself, and that is a big turn off to me, so I don't watch it much.

The few times I have watched it I don't see anything going on to complain about.

All of what I have seen of his show is where some other contractor has mucked it up pretty bad and he has to come in and fix it.

It is Canadian and that shows through a fair amount.
 
I am a big fan of that show. There is a HOH coffee cup on my shelf at work.

I have never seen an episode in which the homeowner told the contractor not to bother with permits. It is always the other way around: the contractor (who winds up doing a bad and incomplete job at an elevated price) tells the HO that they don't need no stinkin' permits. Mike Holmes grew up as a carpenter, I believe, and he does a good deal of the physical labor related to that profession. But he always brings in professionals to do the other trade work, such as HVAC, electrical, concrete, roofing, structural engineers, and landscaping. He urges the viewers to use professional with well established reputations.
Thank you--well said. I love seeing Mike's expression when he finds out that a major code violation actually passed an inspection. We all focus on the "hacks" out there but I find so many times that the inspectors are not the safety valve we think they are. And we see that on this show. I believe that issue is far worse here in the US. One of the reasons he wanted to educate and train people in the business was because he felt so much flawed advice was being promoted on the home-shows produced here. I also feel that the level of professionalism and knowledge level is much higher than any of the shows from the US. Sad but reality to me.
 

Oakey

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Mike's a fantastic carpenter and his work is awesome, it's when the homeowners that have total renovations done to there home and claim no permits were pulled that makes me scratch my head. How can anyone be so blatantly taken over and over without having a clue, it just makes me think a bottom price was accepted and sympathy kinda heads for the door. But I guess I'm getting off topic, apologies.
 

stevenje

Senior Member
Location
Yachats Oregon
My favorite saying from Holmes, "That's unacceptable". If a few more of the inspectors and homeowners had this attitude before Holmes has to get involved with the project, he wouldn't have a show. ;)
 

macmikeman

Senior Member
Once I found out the show was a Canadian show any gripe I had evaporated. Now that is my only gripe about it. They should mention that up front along with letting the American viewing public know that there is a different code book used up there. By the way, two words out of his mouth and I knew right away he was Canuk, I just didn't know the show was...
 

mtfallsmikey

Senior Member
The bad things (electrically) on the show last night were the live circuits hanging rfrom the basement ceiling, the "access door" (HVAC sidewall diffuser) which hid the hot tub plug/GFI, and the bare wire next to the gas line. His HVAC contractor did not insulate any of the ductwork, even in the crawl, which would be verboten in the U.S.
 
The bad things (electrically) on the show last night were the live circuits hanging rfrom the basement ceiling, the "access door" (HVAC sidewall diffuser) which hid the hot tub plug/GFI, and the bare wire next to the gas line. His HVAC contractor did not insulate any of the ductwork, even in the crawl, which would be verboten in the U.S.
I have enjoyed the show for a long time and I believe I have seen all the episodes---They always insulate the ductwork in crawls or above a garage, etc. Ductwork is not required to be insulated in many areas of a home nor is it done in the US---I think Mike Holmes explains in detail why he insulates, where, when and when not to. Pretty clear when you watch his show, and pretty stark how badly most homes are put together here
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
Strange why you can not bring any thing in the top section of there panels except for the service , then all circuits come in sides an bottom of it, weird.
Because they have a rule in their code that I tried to get into the NEC. The line side of the service disconnect is required to be isolated from the load side. This would permit you to work on the load side of the panel with the main turned off without violating the OSHA rules.
 

cowboyjwc

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Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
I love the show and though I don't watch it all the time, I'm a fan.

The one thing though is if he actually tried to build a house the way he repairs one, he would go broke. Level and plumb every stud with the crowns all on the same side and using screws instead of nails, not gonna happen.

I heard how the jobs are paid for too, and I'm still not sure where he gets all of his money. I know he get's some stuff donated, but it seems like they always blur out names on shirts so they're not getting any free advertising. I would have thought that there was a foundation of some sort and that the network put up the front money.
 

WinZip

Senior Member
The producers of the show put up 70% of the cost to re do the old remodel an the owner pays the balance 20% , that's what was said on the show on how an why they started the show.
 

sameguy

Senior Member
Location
New York
Occupation
Master Elec./JW retired
GFCI on a GFCI, like the main GFCI happens all the time and no problems.
How about personal GFCI tapped off an other one and the main GFCI?
still no prob.
 

Dom99

Member
I recall two bathroom remodel instances where the second floor bathroom was protected by an outdoor GFCI. We put the second GFCI and tripped a few times and found it worked ok. Been a few years and still no complaints.

I'm a fan of HOH and he does have a foundation. I love it when he find's one thing wrong and say's "that's unacceptable", then prceeds to tear everything down.
 

Split Bolt

Senior Member
My two cents: Good show & good person! I too noticed things I don't see down here, like cool building materials and horizontal panels. Then, on about the 3rd episode I saw, he said "hoose" instead of "house." Then I knew it was a Canadian show!:grin: Don't program the DVR for it, but will leave it on if I channel surf into it.
 
I watched one episode and the electrician explained that they were not allowed to bring branch circuits in the area of the service entrance conductors that why they install the panels horizontal so the conductors come in staight
 
Location
Florida
If Holmes say anything

If Holmes say anything

If Holmes says anything repeatedly. It is as a contractor or engineer. Code minimum IS NOT ALWAYS ENOUGH. You have to design or install with quality products, and not get lazy and do "What is easiest". The point is, this our profession, lets do a great job regardless if No One will ever see it.
 
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