Incandescent fixtures discontinued?

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kainos

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I have a question related to the new laws that will eliminate most incandescent light bulbs (at least in their current form) in the next 4 years. I understand that stores will keep selling compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs with both types of bulb bases (the threaded kind and the 2-prong kind). But I'm wondering if it will still be possible to buy fixtures with standard threaded sockets after the incandescent ban is in full effect? Or will they switch all the fixtures so that stockpiled incandescent bulbs can no longer be used in them? I can't stand the light produced by CFLs (my migraines don't like fluorescent), so I am already stockpiling several decades worth of incandescent bulbs. I'm trying to decide if I also need to buy all the incandescent fixtures I may need for future building projects.
 

stevebea

Senior Member
Location
Southeastern PA
I have a question related to the new laws that will eliminate most incandescent light bulbs (at least in their current form) in the next 4 years. I understand that stores will keep selling compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs with both types of bulb bases (the threaded kind and the 2-prong kind). But I'm wondering if it will still be possible to buy fixtures with standard threaded sockets after the incandescent ban is in full effect? Or will they switch all the fixtures so that stockpiled incandescent bulbs can no longer be used in them? I can't stand the light produced by CFLs (my migraines don't like fluorescent), so I am already stockpiling several decades worth of incandescent bulbs. I'm trying to decide if I also need to buy all the incandescent fixtures I may need for future building projects.
All I can tell you is that the " Energy Star " fixtures as far as I know all take the GU24 CFL 2 pin lamp. Chandliers, sconces, surface mount, pendants, they all take the GU24 lamp.
 

Electric-Light

Senior Member
I hate the GU-24 thing. The selection of lamps are very limited and they usually cost $5-7 each and you really have to look for it to find.

Typically you can only find 13W 2700K version.
 

Electric-Light

Senior Member
Just a few years ago, G24q 4-pin base, externally ballasted fixtures were available for residential use.

To get Energy Star, the lamp MUST start within 1 second, and have FCC B listing.
The former is the primary cause of premature CFL burn out. CFLs must be made cheap and cathodes are tiny, so when they're instant started, it takes takes away significant amount of life. Another problem is ballast burn out from the ballast living in the base of the lamp.

Though expensive, General Electric external CFL ballasts offer true program start and start within 0.7 second and have FCC B. The fixture will be expensive, but it should resolve much of consumer complaints.
 
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