Is it OK to pass a circuit through panel and not land ground?

JoeNorm

Senior Member
Location
WA
I'm in a situation where I'd like to pass circuits form one panel to another. Can I do this without landing the grounds in the first panel?

thanks
 

nickelec

Senior Member
Location
US
More details? When you say ground do you mean the equipment ground?

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
I'm in a situation where I'd like to pass circuits form one panel to another. Can I do this without landing the grounds in the first panel?
Interesting question, as one would ask why, but I'm sure it's okay, especially if the EGCs follow the same pathway as their respective circuit conductors.
 

JoeNorm

Senior Member
Location
WA
The situation is this:

400 amp service. Two service entrance runs land in two separate panels, side by side in the house. We are installing a backup battery system within one of those runs which will require installing a 200amp disconnect at the meter.

So.....this leaves two panels, one with a ground to neutral bond at the panel in the house, the other will have that bond at the new 200 amp disco.

We will then be moving circuits between panels. I figured landing grounds and neutrals in there respective panels from where they are fed was a good idea.

Thanks
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
The situation is this:

400 amp service. Two service entrance runs land in two separate panels, side by side in the house. We are installing a backup battery system within one of those runs which will require installing a 200amp disconnect at the meter.

So.....this leaves two panels, one with a ground to neutral bond at the panel in the house, the other will have that bond at the new 200 amp disco.

We will then be moving circuits between panels. I figured landing grounds and neutrals in there respective panels from where they are fed was a good idea.

Thanks
All EGC's entering a box/cabinet need tied together within the enclosure as well as bonded to the enclosure if it is metallic. If you are running those conductors through raceway to get to the other panel, only 1 EGC is necessary sized for highest overcurrent protection device associated with those conductors, if metallic raceway it in itself can be the EGC and you wouldn't even need to run a wire type EGC to the other panel.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
The situation is this:

400 amp service. Two service entrance runs land in two separate panels, side by side in the house. We are installing a backup battery system within one of those runs which will require installing a 200amp disconnect at the meter.

So.....this leaves two panels, one with a ground to neutral bond at the panel in the house, the other will have that bond at the new 200 amp disco.

We will then be moving circuits between panels. I figured landing grounds and neutrals in there respective panels from where they are fed was a good idea.

Thanks
Assuming that the existing service disconnect are inside, by moving the service disconnect for one panel outside you're two service disconnects will no longer be grouped in one location. You'll need to move the other one outside as well. I agree that you should land the EGC's in the panel where the branch circuits or feeders originate.
 

growler

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,GA
Assuming that the existing service disconnect are inside, by moving the service disconnect for one panel outside you're two service disconnects will no longer be grouped in one location. You'll need to move the other one outside as well.
That a good catch there that should save the OP some time and trouble. Must be nice to have brains that still work. I totally missed that.
 
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