Kitchen receptacles considered as wet location

Location
Miami, FL
I am in the South Florida area and hadn't fail an inspection on this yet, but I hear from two inspectors that receptacles within 30 inches of sink are considered to be on "wet location", therefore need to be of the weather resistance type, none of them had provided me how they got to define it that way. The closet I can find on that as a wet location is a definition from UL Standard 1598, "a location in which water or other liquid can drip, splash, or flow on or against electrical equipment", this does not mention distance. It may be from Florida Building Code, but can't find it.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Wow, in all my years on this forum, first time I have heard of that issue. Are they asking for a WR receptacle? Here is the definition. If the kitchen was subject to saturation the counter and cabinets would not last long. Its an incorrect call.

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ramsy

Owner/Operator
Location
LA basin, CA
Occupation
Service Electrician 2017 NEC
I am in the South Florida area ..I hear from two inspectors that receptacles within 30 inches of sink are considered to be on "wet location"
EXTRA EXTRA READ ALL ABOUT IT

Without levy's blocking storm surge, inspectors worried about job security are enforcing wet locations everywhere.

South Florida planning departments are keeping the lights on under water, perhaps hoping to collect property taxes long after sea level rises over the rooftops.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Simple answer is that it is not by any stretch of the imagine a wet location by the NEC definition in Article 100. That means that there is either a local amendment or the inspector is making their own code.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
Just playing devil's advocate here, but what if the sink faucet is one of those hose types that could theoretically be pulled out and sprayed right into the receptacle?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Just playing devil's advocate here, but what if the sink faucet is one of those hose types that could theoretically be pulled out and sprayed right into the receptacle?
Still doesn't meet the Article 100 definition of a wet location.
Location, Wet. Installations underground or in concrete slabs or masonry in direct contact with the earth; in locations subject to saturation with water or other liquids, such as vehicle washing areas; and in unprotected locations exposed to weather.
 

rc/retired

Member
Location
Bellevue, Colorado
Occupation
Master Electrician/Inspector retired
Just playing devil's advocate here, but what if the sink faucet is one of those hose types that could theoretically be pulled out and sprayed right into the receptacle?
What if a frog had wings? 😀
I can't tell you how many debates I've had in my office when another inspector asked "what if"
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
It is sad. Those inspectors should be politely shown how they are wrong. If they persist then they should be shown the door. Look at the definition in art.100 of location, wet

Location, Wet. Installations underground or in concrete slabs
or masonry in direct contact with the earth; in locations subject
to saturation with water or other liquids, such as vehicle washing
areas; and in unprotected locations exposed to weather.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
Then every receptacle should be a WR with in-use cover because someone can drag a garden hose in through the front door.
Apparently you haven't seen the photo of the dog that brought the sprinkler inside the house through the dog door :)
 
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