LED can ligts in kitchen

elecmen

Senior Member
Hi, I have 6 LED can lights in a kitchen of a manufactured home that glow dim when off. The circuit is wired correctly and woks fine. What causes this and how can I fix this? All input welcome. Thanks
 

MAC702

Senior Member
Location
Clark County, NV
Your question is missing important information.

What brand/model of LED light?
What brand/model of dimmer switch?
Did you install them or are you attempting to troubleshoot an existing installation?
 
Last edited:

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
You can fix it by changing one of the lamps to incandescent. Or you can add a load resistor or capacitor in parallel. Or try a different 3 wire dimmer.
The underlying cause is that an incandescent or CFL has a current value below which it will give no light, while to output of an LED remains proportional to current well down into the milliamp range as long as the voltage is high enough. Adding the load drops the "off" state voltage.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

elecmen

Senior Member
Your question is missing important information.

What brand/model of LED light?
What brand/model of dimmer switch?
Did you install them or are you attempting to troubleshoot an existing installation?
I am attempting to troubleshoot existing installation. There in no dimmer in the circuit. I will have to pull the light down off the ceiling to see what brand.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Those "lighted switches" that are easier to find in the dark or even those more recently available "night light" containing wall plates can cause this issue, because the "night light" is in series with the switched load when the switch is open.
 

mhanson

Member
Location
Redwood City, CA
Those "lighted switches" that are easier to find in the dark or even those more recently available "night light" containing wall plates can cause this issue, because the "night light" is in series with the switched load when the switch is open.
That's an excellent point, I have found these switches do have a "Let thru voltage" ,which can dimly illuminate an LED light bulb.

-michael
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
There might in fact be nothing wrong with the circuit. As GoldDigger notes, LEDs will glow with very low current. Nothing is a perfect insulator, and switches have ratings for allowed leakage current; that leakage current might be enough to light the LEDs. If you have a perfectly wired 'switch loop', the capacitive coupling from black to white wire might give you a couple of _micro_ amps of current, which might cause a dim light.

I have 4 foot led utility fixtures from Costco. Perfectly reasonably quality and function...and in the 'off' position they glow ever so slightly when plugged in.

-Jon
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
That's an excellent point, I have found these switches do have a "Let thru voltage" ,which can dimly illuminate an LED light bulb.

-michael
I had one recently where they installed one of those "night light" wall plates. It controlled a single 4 lamp T8 ballast and lamps. Those lamps were dimly illuminated when switch was off, I can only imagine LED luminaires would be even worse in most cases.

Took the plate off and it was fine again.
 

marco_polo

Member
Location
USA
I am attempting to troubleshoot existing installation. There in no dimmer in the circuit. I will have to pull the light down off the ceiling to see what brand.
Do they stay dim always or do they eventually turn off completely? I’ve heard of LED drivers making lights stay on very dim until the dc power inside of them dissipates or something like that.
 
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