LED OR HPS street lighting

leeyean

Member
Hi,dear all
please let me ask a question here
do you prefer LED or HPS for street lighting?
as told by many people
LED seemed more liked but high cost
i am not sure about it the really advantage
any words would be thankful
lee
 

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Lower operating wattage= lower electric bills.
Although it depends on what overall amount of light is needed and how that relates to design issues and or size of fixtures.
I do like LED because the color of light is better looking than the orange color of HPS in my opinion. I tend to lean towards a warmer color of LED's 2700k-3500k for any lighting even though some lumen output is compromised. The blue-ish hue of higher K-temps I think are a downer.
 
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leeyean

Member
thanks

thanks

Lower operating wattage= lower electric bills.
Although it depends on what overall amount of light is needed and how that relates to design issues and or size of fixtures.
I do like LED because the color of light is better looking than the orange color of HPS in my opinion. I tend to lean towards a warmer color of LED's 2700k-3500k for any lighting even though some lumen output is compromised. The blue-ish hue of higher K-temps I think are a downer.
hi ,thanks ,it helped me a lot
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
The HPS product is mature and no mfg are spending R&D on HPS.
LED is absolutely the way to go.
High cost is offset by utility rebates, long life (100,000 hours) instant on, dimming, less maintenance etc
Think of it this way: The LED street light you install will last your career and be replaced by the next person

Contact your supplier and get several mfgs reps to show you product. Lots of information at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ssl/consortium.html
 

mirawho

Senior Member
I was never a big fan of LED's, but the technology is advancing in a big way. We have a 50,000 sq.ft. warehouse and use MV/MH high bays. I did a lot of research and I found an LED high bay. Our MH lamps were 400 watts. I found a 196W high bay that had a great CRI, which is an important point when looking at LED's. You don't want green hues on everything. They had a lot of pluses like IP67 rated and a 40K hour life. The manufacturer used Meanwell drivers so it was a good all around high bay. I purchased over a 100 new fixtures and the difference is like night and day. Not only that, the money we save in power consumption is great. Anytime you go LED, Leeyean, spend some researching all comparable fixtures. See if you can get a copy of the LM79 report from the manufacturer if they have one on file. Usually they won't do it for you if they don't have one as it costs them about $1000 to get the testing done. Also, make sure to check the listing. You will find most are CE and not UL or UR. That is one problem we have with a lot manufacturers coming in and showing us their new LED lights. My first question is "is the light UL listed and if not, are you seeking either UL or UR listing" because if they aren't, I can't use this light at a show because I have yet to see a local B&S authority who had CE on their approved listing agency list.
 

hbendillo

Senior Member
LED is quickly becoming the lamp of choice for exterior lighting. Much exterior lighting burns from sundown to sun up so a good opportunity for energy savings.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
I was never a big fan of LED's, but the technology is advancing in a big way. We have a 50,000 sq.ft. warehouse and use MV/MH high bays. I did a lot of research and I found an LED high bay. Our MH lamps were 400 watts. I found a 196W high bay that had a great CRI, which is an important point when looking at LED's. You don't want green hues on everything. They had a lot of pluses like IP67 rated and a 40K hour life. The manufacturer used Meanwell drivers so it was a good all around high bay. I purchased over a 100 new fixtures and the difference is like night and day. Not only that, the money we save in power consumption is great. Anytime you go LED, Leeyean, spend some researching all comparable fixtures. See if you can get a copy of the LM79 report from the manufacturer if they have one on file. Usually they won't do it for you if they don't have one as it costs them about $1000 to get the testing done. Also, make sure to check the listing. You will find most are CE and not UL or UR. That is one problem we have with a lot manufacturers coming in and showing us their new LED lights. My first question is "is the light UL listed and if not, are you seeking either UL or UR listing" because if they aren't, I can't use this light at a show because I have yet to see a local B&S authority who had CE on their approved listing agency list.
Let us know when the first one kicks the bucket. I get the sense that a lot of lifetime guarantees smell like the early 23,000 hour life for CFL's. You'll note now that they are talking more like 4,000 hours. For now I'm thinking that these guarantees are all hat and no cattle.
 

mirawho

Senior Member
Let us know when the first one kicks the bucket. I get the sense that a lot of lifetime guarantees smell like the early 23,000 hour life for CFL's. You'll note now that they are talking more like 4,000 hours. For now I'm thinking that these guarantees are all hat and no cattle.
We have a lot of LED intelligent lighting in our rental stock and it does pretty well. They get a lot of work and the failure rate is low. The drivers are another story. The main problem with LED's hasn't been life, it has been the CRI. We had a guy demo some lights in our showroom and told me they were around 85 - 90. I got out a meter and they were more like 71, hence the green cast. Hard to rent a green light to someone. Anyway, since our highbay is an industrial fixture I am curious about it. CFL, I was never big on those. Their life compares to incandescent, maybe even not as good. And then the disposal process. And, LED replacements for the A25 is not going to happen any time soon. They do have them but the lamp bases get incredibly hot. We will see.
 
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