NJ Solar

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revolt

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Juicy, NJ Does not license home improvement contractors. It does require them to be registered. The difference is a license shows aptitude (you take a test and meet certain trade requirements) and registering shows a 98.6 degree temperature. My 18 year old daughter could get a home improvement registration number providing she has a company and the proper insurance. She can't nail two sticks together. Unless NABCEP is a state government agency they cannot license anyone. They can certify training and the state may recognize that training such as CEU credits. If a NJ EC let's a unlicesnsed solar company install panels the Boards opinion is it is the same as hiring a plumber wire a house on the ECs license.As far as enforcement I have spoken with different inspectors and have gotten various opinions. This is the part that is frustrating.
 

revolt

Member
An E-Mail dated March 12, 2009, was received from Richard Paris, Investigator for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Division of Professional Licensure, regarding the installation of photovoltaic systems in the State of New Jersey.
The Committee unanimously recommended that a letter be sent to Mr. Paris directing him to the Board?s website address so that he may obtain its Laws, Rules and Regulations. Additionally, Mr. Paris will be advised that the "racks" or any other portion of the photovoltaic system that is non-electrical does not need to be installed by a licensed electrical contractor who holds a business permit. However, an electrical contractor is permitted to do work that is incidental to the installation of the photovoltaic system.
(Board of Electrical Contractors meeting April 1, 2009)
 

davedottcom

Senior Member
"I love that alot of people think there is nothing to know or do on a roof as far as the Electrical portion is concerned.
And that a 3 day, one week, or even 12 week course is enough to learn the Electrical side."



"The NABCEP certification does NOT make an Electrician out of anyone."
AMEN Brother!

First of all, when people who have never even wired a PV system say it's "easy" it's because they don't know enough to know they don't know what they are talking about! :grin:


I've been wiring PV systems for about 5 years... I've wired about 45 or so systems, from 2 KW to 32KW with a 200KW coming soon. One word I would never use to describe article 690 is EASY.

But, in their defense a lot of them have been taught this! Most of these Solar schools that you see pop up every 1.3 seconds are designed to create "installers" which creates PV sales which is big money. Some of these schools are not only profiting from the tuition they charge for the classes but also from their students becoming installers and purchasing the PV systems. Either by selling them a "Dealership" or they are actually working for the PV supliers. They want the "students" to think this is a very simple business to be in & they over simplify some of the different aspects of the actual installation process. Especially the ones that will consume some of their profits, like the EC. These schools will profit more if the installers are actually succesful and purchase pv systems over & over but I think they also realize that there is a huge profit to be made just on the "students" that only purchase 1 system, lose money and fail.
It's sort of like the Automatic Home Generators. The manufacturers make it sound like the homeowner can practically just "plug it in" when in reality it's much, much more complicated than that. Again, this becomes painfully apparent when the homeowner speaks to an actual "Experienced" electrician.
 

revolt

Member
How are other states handling this? The Massachusetts Division of Professional Licensing apparently wrote the NJ Board of Electrical Contractors to see how they are dealing with solar installations. Are any states licensing solar installers? What are they allowed to do?
 

davedottcom

Senior Member
Here in FL, the solar "installers" are allowed to install the rails & modules. It gets a little tricky because they usually do the bonding while they are installing the modules. I inspect the bonding and add or change anything I don't like. So far, for the most part they have done a great job.
 

mtnelectrical

Senior Member
I know how to sweat copper pipes. but I wouldn't even dream to show a plumber inspector my work. Well that is here in Jersey.
Finally I am taking the course for PV systems and it very interesting, some calcs, formulas and a lot of paperwork, but I think is worth it, it opens new doors for our businesses. Installation and design should be closely supervised by EC's. This is more than basic calculations.
 

revolt

Member
mtnelectrical, Ask the instructor if he thinks that the company installing the panels needs an electrical contractors license and electrical business permit. Not just supervision or someone to sign a permit. The NJ Board of Electrical Contractors published in the Spring 2010 edition of Construction Code Communicator that the company does in fact needs one.
Only electrical contractors can install the panels and associated wiring for PV solar sytems in New Jersey. If they don't have a license they HAVE to hire an EC to do the work. All this work for us if we can only keep pushing the right buttons!!!
 
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