Occupancy sensors that actually work?

tpa-fl

New member
Location
Florida
Has anyone had good luck (and reliability) with occupancy sensors?

I currently have three failed (stuck ON, green motion light on 24/7) Leviton ODC-OS-I1W ceiling occupancy sensors in our building. Even when they did work, they weren't terribly good and would false-trigger even in rooms with no reflective surfaces / air vents / heat sources. Can someone recommend a different one?

We also have a ton of Lightolier ITS2U wall switch occupancy sensors which have been reasonably good but a couple times a year I get a trouble ticket where one stops responding, usually with the relay OFF and will function normally after being reset. Does anyone have any recommendations on these as well?

I love the idea of having areas illuminated only when there are people using the spaces, BUT I also want the sensors to work seamlessly, without generating work orders to constantly repair them.
 

sparkycoog

Member
Location
Texas
I hate to sound like a broken record but Lutron's Occupancy/vacancy sensors are the only ones I've found to work reliably so much so that we use them in our own office and have gotten too lazy to touch light switches. They have the regular ones that go in the wall http://www.lutron.com/en-US/Products/Pages/Sensors/Occupancy-Vacancy/MaestroOccVacSensors/overview.aspx and come in regular dimmers, switches (not sure if they need a neutral or not) and they have cheap ones made specifically for LED lights.

The one we use in our own office and have found creative ways of using in various applications are the radio powr Savr http://www.lutron.com/en-US/products/Pages/sensors/occupancy-vacancy/wirelessradiopowrsavr/overview.aspx With these, you just replace your switch with a Maestro RF switch or dimmer (they have plug in devices too), then install the battery powered Occupancy sensor on the ceiling and link the two together. We've had ours up for 3 years on the original battery so far. It's a very smart device and works best where the sensor might be blocked by the door and works within 30 feet of the in wall switch or dimmer. Maestro RF has some other uses too such as pairing it up with a pico remote switch and they're all compatible with the radio ra 2 and Homeworks QS systems too
 

Electric-Light

Senior Member
Has anyone had good luck (and reliability) with occupancy sensors?

I currently have three failed (stuck ON, green motion light on 24/7) Leviton ODC-OS-I1W ceiling occupancy sensors in our building.
What are the luminaire power supply ballasts? If you have a Fluke meter that does "fast max", grab this value on one of the ballasts as the switch is energized. On newer ballasts, you will only see 2-3A. You'll see 20-30A or more on fast max capture. This is an issue with some electronic ballasts and CFLs. Your sensor is sticking closed because the inrush welds the contacts together after some time. If I were you, I'd replace the sensor with the proper type to address the miss-detection issue and drive the fixtures through appropriately sized lighting contactor. I'd call the ballast manufacturer with the model, quantity on circuit, then have them recommend contactor sizing. Fit the lighting contactor first and observe the noise under load. Be mindful in their placement so any humming noise it makes would not disturb the occupants.



Even when they did work, they weren't terribly good and would false-trigger even in rooms with no reflective surfaces / air vents / heat sources. Can someone recommend a different one?
Wattstopper 1000A ultrasonic.. Legrand/P&S or whatever other alias they're sold under. There are three types available in general. IR, ultrasonic and dual. You need to choose the technology and field of detection appropriate for the area. I hate the ones that use potentiometer to make adjustments. They're the sensors from hell. The ones that you set by dip switches or using a sequence of pushing/holding while observing the LED indicator have been much more reliable in my experience and don't suffer from settings drifting off. Dual technology is the most expensive, but they also have the least nuisance trips. In any case, proper tuning by a competent tech is important.
 
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