Pallets in front of panel.

We installed a row of machines directly in front of the wall with all our panels & disconnects, leaving about 50 inches of space behind the machines for access to the panels.
Unfortunately the workers are just barely able to squeeze a row of bins and pallets into this space, completely blocking the entire wall, including the main panel.
The fire inspector always cites this, so they move the pallets, take a picture for her, then move the pallets back.
As an electrician, this burns me up (figuratively, so far) but I am not 'empowered' to do anything about it. They will tell me it is a necessary part of the work flow.

How many of you think I am an idiot for tolerating this.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
We installed a row of machines directly in front of the wall with all our panels & disconnects, leaving about 50 inches of space behind the machines for access to the panels.
Unfortunately the workers are just barely able to squeeze a row of bins and pallets into this space, completely blocking the entire wall, including the main panel.
The fire inspector always cites this, so they move the pallets, take a picture for her, then move the pallets back.
As an electrician, this burns me up (figuratively, so far) but I am not 'empowered' to do anything about it. They will tell me it is a necessary part of the work flow.

How many of you think I am an idiot for tolerating this.
This is really the fire inspector's thing to worry about. Were I he, at the third time I came in and saw this it would be a $500 fine, or whatever maximum for the third offense is, and use whatever multipliers since it's willful. I'd also direct the plant to paint the area in front of the panels yellow or hash the area yellow and have them post a "No storage in yellow floor space" sign. And then when I came in the fourth time and saw it again I'd double the fine. Rinse and repeat until they get the message.
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Unless you need to get in there for a real emergency, then yes, it is kinda your problem.
I’m thinking as an outside contractor. Usually an emergency is well over by the time I’m there. I’ve never been afraid to tell owners/managers to move stuff, I’ll move it on their dime or call me when it’s clear. They know what needs to be done.
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
I once pointed out a glaring electrical hazard to someone as I walked through a lumber mill on my way to a project. I wasn't there to address it, but I couldn't un-see it. The next time I went there nothing had changed, and I said something again as a "friendly reminder". 6 months later I went back for something else and that part of the mill had burned down; turned out the thing I pointed out was the cause. I said nothing, but the guy I had originally pointed it out to saw me and told me that he should have listened to me. Then he half jokingly accused me of sabotage in order to make my point. Thank goodness I was in another state when the fire happened...
 
Top