Pulling wire setup for a non tool carrier

dicklaxt

Senior Member
How do you keep from exceeding the recommended bending radius of a conductor when pulling conductors or cables in and out of a conduit fitting,,,,,,,video links would be great but I can't locate any thus far.

I don't believe I ever witnessed this phase of construction in all my time at job sites,I must have been sleeping or talking to a secretary.:thumbsup:

dick
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
How do you keep from exceeding the recommended bending radius of a conductor when pulling conductors or cables in and out of a conduit fitting,,,,,,,video links would be great but I can't locate any thus far.

I don't believe I ever witnessed this phase of construction in all my time at job sites,I must have been sleeping or talking to a secretary.:thumbsup:

dick
I assume you are asking about conduit bodies and not fittings. If the conduit body is sized according to 314.28 requirements, or has been tested and marked for the conductors installed, it is usually difficult to exceed the recommended bending radius for conductors.

Cables is a different game.
 

dicklaxt

Senior Member
In my book a conduit body is a fitting but not all fittings can have wire or cable pulled in and out of them.I did not ask for a Code reference but how to,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

dick
 

dicklaxt

Senior Member
Well I don't know how to word it any differently so would a moderator please delete this question,,,sorry for the trouble/confusion.

dick
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
I don't think that there is any minimum bending radius for most of the 600 volt and less conductors. If the fittings (conduit bodies) are correctly sized, you should not have any problems. The real issue of getting conductors into a conduit body is when you are using #4 and larger and do not have a fitting that complies with the rules in 314.28.

Normally, you don't do anything to prevent the "overbending" of the conductors. Often some type of protecion is used on the ends of the fittings to prevent insulation damage. Some fittings have rollers built into the ends, but I have never had any luck with those...the pressure from the conductors pushing against the rollers cause them to pop out of their holders. One brand of fittings has snap in spring steel guide that provides a smooth rounded edge to help you slide the conductors into the fitting. I have seen cardboard with wire pulling lube and pieces of sheet metal used to do the same thing.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
In my book a conduit body is a fitting but not all fittings can have wire or cable pulled in and out of them.I did not ask for a Code reference but how to,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

dick
Yes a conduit body is a fitting...as are many other items. The common use meaning of the term fitting in my area is "conduit body". This is one of those "code language" v "real world language" issues.

It even caught CMP 8 many code cycles ago. The old codes said you were permitted to have 360? of bend between fittings...that was changed when a proposal pointed out that a coupling is a fitting. Of course the original intent was that the word "fitting" as used in that code section meant "conduit body". The code was using "real world language" and not "code language".
 

plumb bob

Member
I'll tell you what, it isn't always pretty. Especially when you get into bigger conduit and wire sizes. Getting 600 mcm thru an LB, even if sized correctly, can be tough. A lot of times, it can come down to how well the wire pulling went. Conducters fed into pipe in a nice untwisted manner can be much easier to tuck into fittings and boxes. Twists and (pardon my french) azzholes, well I won't lie, I've seen a rubber mallet used to "help" them into a fitting while the biggest guy on the crew pulled wires one at a time. A megger is your friend when these methods are employed.
 
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