Pushmatic lockout?

hillbilly1

Senior Member
It’s been ages since I’ve seen a pushmatic panel, so I can’t remember if they have a door, if so, a universal whole panel lock can be used. Seems like I remember they don’t have a door.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
It’s been ages since I’ve seen a pushmatic panel, so I can’t remember if they have a door, if so, a universal whole panel lock can be used. Seems like I remember they don’t have a door.
They typically don't have a door and a door look is never permitted as a lockout device.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
They typically don't have a door and a door look is never permitted as a lockout device.
Not the factory door lock, a whole panel lockout. I build ours, OSHA has seen them, and like them. They prevent the panel door from being opened, and standard lockout locks and tags including multi hasps can be used with it. Unlike the ones on the market which are designed for residential, mine are specifically designed for commercial and industrial panels that do not have exposed cover screws. It can be modified to fit any size panel, vertically or horizontally.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Not the factory door lock, a whole panel lockout. I build ours, OSHA has seen them, and like them. They prevent the panel door from being opened, and standard lockout locks and tags including multi hasps can be used with it. Unlike the ones on the market which are designed for residential, mine are specifically designed for commercial and industrial panels that do not have exposed cover screws. It can be modified to fit any size panel, vertically or horizontally.
Everything I have read from OSHA says the individual breaker itself must be locked out, not the cover.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Everything I have read from OSHA says the individual breaker itself must be locked out, not the cover.
The OSHA reps we shown it to approved of its use. There is a couple of manufactures that make a version for loadcenters. With the lock in place, the cover cannot be removed. Very handy with remodels, a large number of breakers can be turned off without having 30 or more padlocks and tags hanging out.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
1910.147(d)(4)(i) very clearly requires a lock on each energy isolation device. That language, in my opinion, prohibits the use of a panel door lock for energy isolation.
 
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