removing molding

Status
Not open for further replies.

Vinniem

Senior Member
Location
Central Jersey
looking for tips form the pro's on removing molding, especially the type the runs just under a ceiling. I do more commerical and industrial work rather then residental.

Don't want to do serious damage to it. Any tips would help. Thank you
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Make sure you cut all of the joints and seams with a sharp razor knife. I've had better luck driving the nails all the way through if you can see them.
Good advice here. Score through the paint and/or painter's caulk along both edges of the crown mold, then drive the finish nails through with a nailset. They're hiding beneath the little dots of wood filler.
 

whillis

Member
Location
Vancouver, BC
I picked up a pry bar (it's maybe 18" long) that has a 3" wide flat prying end. It works very well in removing moldings without destroying them or the wall. I think I got it at the big orange box.

Remember to cut the caulk at the joints and seams first.
 

Sharpie

Senior Member
Location
PA
Place a sturdy wide spackling knife (on lath strips or shims) between the prybar and the ceiling or wall. That protects the drywall or plaster from getting marred.

Also, try popping the trim off without pushing the nails though. Either the nails will be stuck in the wall or the trim. If they're in the trim, use your linemans on the back side to pull the nails through, and the front remains undisturbed.

Just work it slowly and don't get in a rush.


One more thing, figure out what the last piece was that was installed and take it apart from there (reverse the installation).
 

macmikeman

Senior Member
Northern Tools, and Harbor Freight stores. Both carry little bity Japanese? pry bars that are pretty sharp new. For only a few bucks. that is about the one good thing you can get from those places that really work good. They work exceptional for prying old molding loose, but first try the suggestion of punching the nails all the way thru if you can do it.
 

ceknight

Senior Member
.....then drive the finish nails through with a nailset.
That's the one thing you don't want to do if you can avoid it. Most nail sets have tapered barrels, and as you drive the nail through you will widen the nail hole. If you have to drive finish nails through the crown to remove it, do so with a sturdy finishing nail of your own (that you Kleined the point off of first).

Oh, and don't forget that sharp knife through the caulk, eh? :) :)
 

ItsHot

Senior Member
Sawzall

Sawzall

Sawzall !!:grin: not really. I like the wonderbar, I think Stanley makes them. Just a little prybar to help the start. Then use a regular size prybar. And as others have said, don't forget to cut paint and caulk with sharp utility razorblade.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
The little prybars are sometimes called "PryBabies."

That's the one thing you don't want to do if you can avoid it. Most nail sets have tapered barrels, and as you drive the nail through you will widen the nail hole. If you have to drive finish nails through the crown to remove it, do so with a sturdy finishing nail of your own (that you Kleined the point off of first).

Oh, and don't forget that sharp knife through the caulk, eh? :) :)
I use the thinnest of three that I have, and I haven't split one yet. It's true that you don't have to refill the original nail holes your way, but since you have to fill the new holes anyway, it's no biggie.



Oh, does anyone recommend cutting through the paint and caulk first? :grin:
 

DHkorn

Member
Good advice about pulling the nails all the way thru

Good advice about pulling the nails all the way thru

Good advice about pulling the nails all the way thru rather then hitting them back out.
Some nails will pull out of the wall and stay in the molding. Use your kliens to pull them all the way thru and the molding will look untouched when you re-install it. It's also a great excuse to by a cordless nailer.
 

Smart $

Esteemed Member
Location
Ohio
The little prybars are sometimes called "PryBabies."

I use the thinnest of three that I have, ...
To start the process, I use a 6-in-1, perhaps with a "penetration persuader", to spread the molding away from the wall first. Using a prybar puts the leverage point on the visable part of the wall... and sometimes creates scuff marks on initial penetraion. Using a 6-in-1 puts the leverage point behind the molding, so it gets covered up on reinstall. After creating a sufficient gap in one spot per section, I switch to a prybar to complete removal of the section.

 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top