Residential

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MBLES

Senior Member
What kind of things do you guys look for in residential ruff in I have done my first house and i am very nervous about the inspector What should i say if he points out obvious stuff. BY the way what if the island is not built could i request partial inspection
 

Bobhook149

Senior Member
alot of the time i find the inspectors understand when say an island isn't built, he will see the outlet on the finish. other than that what they look for is code compliance. Grounds twisted together, 2 appliance branch circuits in the kitchen, a laundry outlet, grounds (water) (foundation) (rods) ect.:D
 

mikeames

Senior Member
Location
Germantown MD
Basics basics basics (assuming you have done a proper job in general)

Nail plates
Proper spacing of outlets
Proper number of circuits SABC kitchen etc...
GFI and ARC faults in proper locations.
Wire sizes
overall quality of work ( Wires not twisted to heck or stretched like a guitar string)
Cabels fastened and secured in proper locations (not too tight)
smokes
bonding of CW pipe and or UFER
Service (a host of things)

Basically the little things that some may overlook as being minor is what you may get dinged for.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
more pick as compared to who?,,,and why are you using twelve everywhere?
Residential receptacle boxes used are generally smaller in size than those used in commercial, so it's a lot easier to excede the max. Many houses are wired in #12 or larger, most need not be, but #12 is more durable when it comes to bending, I've been on too many calls where the #14 broke at the switch or receptacle. On larger houses, there are bigger loads such as chandoliers that can easily excede 15 amps. I've gone behind too many romex yankers that put half the lights in the house on a 15 amp circuit, then wonder why the breaker trips when the homeowner has a party, and has all of the lights on at one time. #14 is fine for your run of the mill FHA house, But if you do custom homes you will need more 15 amp circuits or fewer 20 amp circuits.
 

c2500

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
I just passed an inspection with only one countertop receptacle....because the other is going into the not yet built island. Given the basement is accesible, the wire has not been run yet. (remodel)

Things to watch for....

Box fill
Wire stapled as required
Reidentify conducters as needed on 3 or 4 ways
box spacing is correct...especially in the kitchen
making up grounds
FIRE CAULKING
nail plates
derate wires when running multiples through the same hole
no more than 2 wires per connector as it enters the panel

c2500
 

c2500

Senior Member
Location
South Carolina
Residential receptacle boxes used are generally smaller in size than those used in commercial, so it's a lot easier to excede the max. Many houses are wired in #12 or larger, most need not be, but #12 is more durable when it comes to bending, I've been on too many calls where the #14 broke at the switch or receptacle. On larger houses, there are bigger loads such as chandoliers that can easily excede 15 amps. I've gone behind too many romex yankers that put half the lights in the house on a 15 amp circuit, then wonder why the breaker trips when the homeowner has a party, and has all of the lights on at one time. #14 is fine for your run of the mill FHA house, But if you do custom homes you will need more 15 amp circuits or fewer 20 amp circuits.
It is easy to exceed the max because alot of guys are looking at price only. I hate working in those shallow boxes so a few extra pennies for a few more cubic inches is worth it to me. I agree, custom homes should not be wired to code...they should be wired for the real world use.

c2500
 

mlnk

Senior Member
I go to the building department and talk to the inspector or at least the counter expert about the local "interpretation" of the code before I start. Some AHJs allow only one wire per drilled hole, and only one cable per staple, fans and smoke detectors excluded from AFCI, #4 Cu not allowed for service entrance conductors or sub panel feeders, separate circuit for garbage disposal or garage door opener. Edison base fuse for the fau no NM cable allowed-use AC cable. So what if it is in the NEC-it is not in our NEC.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
I've been on too many calls where the #14 broke at the switch or receptacle.
That's usually caused by improper wire stripping, and ringing of the conductor.

On larger houses, there are bigger loads such as chandoliers that can easily excede 15 amps.
A load like that should receive an adequate independent circuit. Poor planning can happen anywhere.

#14 is fine for your run of the mill FHA house, But if you do custom homes you will need more 15 amp circuits or fewer 20 amp circuits.
I do prefer 20a GP receptacle circuits, because plug-in loads are unpredictable.
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
That's usually caused by improper wire stripping, and ringing of the conductor.

A load like that should receive an adequate independent circuit. Poor planning can happen anywhere.

I do prefer 20a GP receptacle circuits, because plug-in loads are unpredictable.
I agree Larry, and I've done 1 1/2 million dollar custom homes and I still run 14 for the lighting circuits.
 

daleuger

Senior Member
Location
earth
Some AHJs allow only one wire per drilled hole, and only one cable per staple,
I pointed that out to another electrician at work I was working with wiring a 1500 sq ft basement when I saw him stapling multiple cables. You'd have thought I was ready for the funny farm to hear him tell it. :mad:
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
That's usually caused by improper wire stripping, and ringing of the conductor.

My point proven, #12 is much more forgiving.

A load like that should receive an adequate independent circuit. Poor planning can happen anywhere.

Resi electricians plan circuits? Haven't seen much of that. It's get in, get out.

I do prefer 20a GP receptacle circuits, because plug-in loads are unpredictable.
The general purpose receptacle circuits are usually the lightest loaded in residental.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Haha need to work for more EC's with your point of view.:roll:
Come on over! :)

I look at electrical systems with performance in mind. It's an active, dynamic system. I try to envision how it's going to be used. We place a lot more than lamps on our receptacle circuits these days, with TVs, computers, and other electronics.

For example, in a mid-sized home, I might put two or three bedrooms' worth of room, closet, hallway, and bath lighting on a single 15a circuit, and a single 20a receptacle circuit takes care of the bedrooms and the hallway.

In a larger house I did a few years ago, each kids room has four recesessed lights, a ceiling fan/light, a walk-in closet, and a separate bath with sink ights, ceiling lights, and an exhaust fan, so each got its own 15a lighting circuit.

I also gave each bedroom its own receptacle circuit, but also only 15a, which I felt was fine for 2 receptacles per wall. The master bed room, with six cans and 2 fans, and an outdoor hot tub, got a single 15a lighting circuit.

The master bath lighting circuit, with separate throne and shower rooms, recessed and sink lights, and two exhaust fans, plus twin walk-in closets, got a 15a circuit. The 12 split-wired bedroom receptacles were divided into two 15a circuits.
 

daleuger

Senior Member
Location
earth
Come on over! :)

I look at electrical systems with performance in mind. It's an active, dynamic system. I try to envision how it's going to be used. We place a lot more than lamps on our receptacle circuits these days, with TVs, computers, and other electronics.

For example, in a mid-sized home, I might put two or three bedrooms' worth of room, closet, hallway, and bath lighting on a single 15a circuit, and a single 20a receptacle circuit takes care of the bedrooms and the hallway.

In a larger house I did a few years ago, each kids room has four recesessed lights, a ceiling fan/light, a walk-in closet, and a separate bath with sink ights, ceiling lights, and an exhaust fan, so each got its own 15a lighting circuit.

I also gave each bedroom its own receptacle circuit, but also only 15a, which I felt was fine for 2 receptacles per wall. The master bed room, with six cans and 2 fans, and an outdoor hot tub, got a single 15a lighting circuit.

The master bath lighting circuit, with separate throne and shower rooms, recessed and sink lights, and two exhaust fans, plus twin walk-in closets, got a 15a circuit. The 12 split-wired bedroom receptacles were divided into two 15a circuits.
I try to think that much and what little residential I do get in on it's not always ultimately my call, and end up with somebody that thinks it's ok to put six or eight can lights and 8 or 9 receptacles on the same 15A circuit. Commercial as you know is usually laid out in prints and USUALLY (not always) a lot better thought out than that. It does get frustrating a lot of the stuff they let fly around here that goes against common sense and a lot of what I was taught elsewhere and sometimes even code.

I don't know if you saw the thread I started with the service change I did with the owner, that's a shining example. http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=117528 He himself did that 3" PVC and he let it fly. I don't mean to bad mouth but come ON!
 
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