Rigging Switchgear

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BJ Conner

Senior Member
Location
97006
Paper Dolls

Paper Dolls

A few things could come into play very quickly. If this is a real cause for concern go to the Architectural plans and check the door size(s). In most cases this is where they have 8'-0" doors and or roll-up doors usually equal to double wide door way each 36" wide.

I'll go on the record and say "NO' this should not be a concern, first off the building is usually dryed in. These means that weather should not be a concern to anything that would occupy the space, only then does the equipment get set.

IMO, you don't want gear on site, unprotected from the weather and one certainly don't want other trades working around it (unpackaged) or over it. No other trades care about the gear and will use it and abuse it at will.

We called that playing with "paper dolls". Get an architechial plan, cut out a scale figure of your switchgear and "drive" it throught the building.
Despite all the bittiching about different switchgear manufactures they can be a help. They all provide rigging, handling and storage instructions. IF something goes south and you weren't following their instruction it could cost you $$$.
Unloading, moving, and storing electrical equipment requires prior planning. Remember the 6Ps!
 

templdl

Senior Member
Location
Wisconsin
worst thing i've ever seen was a piece of MV gear from abbot laboratories, of buena park, calif. (long ago out of business)

$2M thereabouts worth, in a refinery... got asked the wed. before thanksgiving, to stay a couple hours, and pull some covers
off, so that hipot could be done over the 4 day weekend, to allow commissioning.... when we opened the covers, we found
signal cables sleeved thru 34.5 kv enclosures, in 1/2" aluminum flex, attached to panel enclosures with sticky backs and
tie wraps... some of the sticky backs had come loose, and the flex was hanging right above the 2,000 amp main bus, the next
couple sticky backs to come off would have dropped it across the bus when it was live.... the list went on and on... we rebuilt
the gear that weekend, brought in induction soldering equipment, even a portable plating tank for redoing the bus bars that
had to be cut and reshaped.... nothing would hipot at 50kv, corona was walking all over the gear....

your remark about stickybacks for attachment brought it to memory... i'm assuming you broker switchgear... how do you
offset contractual liability for something you provide, when the vendor supplies junk? the vendor of the above mentioned gear
closed up shop as a result of the gear mentioned above that they provided.

I was the manufacturer who sold the gear through a distributor, my best distributor, the only distributor that I would trust with handling my equipment.
I was fortunate to have been a part of a very well respected business unit of my company and received no conflict when resolving my issues with my gear. My distributor was extremely helpful politically. I had a couple of on sight meeting with the dist. rep, and the head of the state engineering dept since this involved a state university. Needless to say that it was a tense meeting. When you have egg all over your face because of total disregard for items which were clearly in the specs. I have always remembered who signs my paycheck but I also must take responsibility for my product. There were a number of major items that it had to correct such as having the Al ground bus pulled and replaced with copper. (Keep in mind that this was about 15 years ago, something I'd rather forget) There was something about metering as I can recall that was also costly. I was able to get the state to accept the sticky backs which would have been a real pain in the butt to correct.
I was quite pleased the way it turned out but it was a matter of working with reasonable people, taking care of the major problems, and the state not nit picking and my division not protesting the back charges and supplying the correctparts in an expedient manor. The state could have been real bastards. We all targeted the important issues and considered the stick backs minor. This was a big piece of distribution gear. We targeted the important issues and resolved them with expediency. As I recall I received not resistance from my division for neither back charges nor delay in their supplying the replacement items.

It rely was helpful that some good friends of mine were doing the install and they could give me some input and feed back. Because we knew one another and my relationship with the distributor, that the installers had a good relationship with the state that we were to resolve the issues. I could have been a disaster. It is important that you prevent the customer from getting even more irritated than they all ready are.
 

horsegoer

Senior Member
Location
NJ
We called that playing with "paper dolls". Get an architechial plan, cut out a scale figure of your switchgear and "drive" it throught the building.
Despite all the bittiching about different switchgear manufactures they can be a help. They all provide rigging, handling and storage instructions. IF something goes south and you weren't following their instruction it could cost you $$$.
Unloading, moving, and storing electrical equipme

nt requires prior planning. Remember the 6Ps!

What are the 6P's? I think I know one... Planning:D
 
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