Running one neutral cable to shed

MagicMikey

New User
Location
Canada
Occupation
Electric Mechanic
Hello, my sheds subpanel currently does not have a neutral wire. Right now, there’s an 8/2 cable from a 40A breaker in my main panel going to the subpanel in the shed that is powering my pool pump at 220VAC on a 15A breaker.

I want to add some receptacles and lights to run off of 120VAC but there’s no neutral in the subpanel. I know that the best way might be to replace the 8/2 cable with an 8/3 but that is very costly.

I would prefer to run another cable, perhaps 10/2 simply for the neutral wire. The subpanel will have only two 15A breakers running off the 120VAC, hence the smaller gauge.

Would this be an issue?

Thanks.
 

McLintock

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician
Should just run a 6/3 out there and put in a new sub panel. Bigger is better you never know what else you/someone may add on.

I agree with others pay to have it done right, no need to jerry rig something together and it cause a fire


“ shoot low boys their riding shetland ponies”
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Use a 240 x 120/240 transformer and then you don't need to run additional cables between structures. Depending on circumstances might still be less cost to replace with correct cable though. I myself would run raceway and pull individual conductors instead of cable in most cases.
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
I doubt it changes anything but the OP is under the Canadian code.

Roger
 

suemarkp

Senior Member
Location
Kent, WA
Occupation
Engineer
You said pool pump. Feeders supplying pool equipment have more restrictions under the NEC (insulated equipment ground, wiring method restrictions). So not only do you have the normal rules to comply with (running all the conductors together in a common cable or conduit, only one circuit to a building) pools add another layer of complexity. Not sure how canada changes this though.
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
Unless this is a diy project, the cost of labor would exceed the cost of the wire, so it makes sense to simply install the proper cable and not try to somehow enhance the existing cable with an add-on neutral.


Jon
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
There are really two NEC compliant options - new conductors or a small xmfr out in the shed. Previous posters have suggested both options. Neither is going to bust the bank.

This sounds suspiciously like a DIY project.
 
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