safety meetings and requirements

mannyb

Senior Member
i was designated the safety coordinator for our shop. some of our customers want to see a safety program in place and keep up with records.
i was wondering what are some of the things any shop were doing that have proven well in your shop. i know in the end its up to my shop but
i would like a better perspective with people in the industry. i dont just want input on electrical JSA. i would like to hear anything with safety.
i can be fork truck, msds, hot work permit, etc, etc. i would also like to hear, if any, something on who you would distruibute, would it be emai, app, or plain old safety meeting once a week or month. I am not going hold anyone responsible i just want to feed back on safety programs
 

mgookin

Senior Member
Location
Fort Myers, FL
You need to go through your facility and identify everything that could pose a risk to personnel.
Without knowing anything about your facility, there's not a lot we can do to help you.
 

luckylerado

Senior Member
i was designated the safety coordinator for our shop. some of our customers want to see a safety program in place and keep up with records.
i was wondering what are some of the things any shop were doing that have proven well in your shop. i know in the end its up to my shop but
i would like a better perspective with people in the industry. i dont just want input on electrical JSA. i would like to hear anything with safety.
i can be fork truck, msds, hot work permit, etc, etc. i would also like to hear, if any, something on who you would distruibute, would it be emai, app, or plain old safety meeting once a week or month. I am not going hold anyone responsible i just want to feed back on safety programs
Some of the things that I have seen implemented in the field:

Drug testing
100% hand protection required. Cut resistant gloves 100% of the time
Required min PPE: HardHat, Glasses, hi visibility clothing, safety toe boots. 100% of the time
Weekly relevant toolbox talks documented
Require at least 1 CPR and Firstaid certified "competent" person at each jobsite
Require OSHA 10 for field and 30 for foreman
Relevant training prior to a specific scope of work: confined space, dawn doff, hot work, roof work, etc.
Pre Task Planning checklists
Stretching and Bending. Really, this is becoming more and more prevalent...
SDS and OSHA 300 properly maintained and understood
Incentives for near miss reporting
Daily "Plan of the Day" meetings with the whole crew highlighting hazards for that day.

Don't be afraid to be an Hard case. Finding your name on the porta potty walls is a badge of honor. :thumbsup:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Some of the things that I have seen implemented in the field:

Drug testing
100% hand protection required. Cut resistant gloves 100% of the time
Required min PPE: HardHat, Glasses, hi visibility clothing, safety toe boots. 100% of the time
Weekly relevant toolbox talks documented
Require at least 1 CPR and Firstaid certified "competent" person at each jobsite
Require OSHA 10 for field and 30 for foreman
Relevant training prior to a specific scope of work: confined space, dawn doff, hot work, roof work, etc.
Pre Task Planning checklists
Stretching and Bending. Really, this is becoming more and more prevalent...
SDS and OSHA 300 properly maintained and understood
Incentives for near miss reporting
Daily "Plan of the Day" meetings with the whole crew highlighting hazards for that day.

Don't be afraid to be an asshole. Finding your name on the porta potty walls is a badge of honor. :thumbsup:
Good things. I used to work at an industrial plant that handled wastewater. A few things I remember from that:

In areas where hearing protection is required, have ear plug dispensers handy. Generator room required double protection.

Biohazards require disposable gloves (multiple sizes). The ash handling area required dust masks (should be there in a dispenser).

Appropriate signage EVERYWHERE (High noise areas, hazardous atmosphere, engulfment hazard, caustic/corrosive chemicals, high voltage/multiple sources of power, 'equipment may start on its own', etc.).

Eye/body wash stations where needed, checklists that say they have been tested. Up to date fire extinguishers. If you use SCBA (we did, for changing 2 ton chlorine cylinders), have a log and cleaning equipment for that, and properly train employees on their use.

Ladder/scaffold/manlift safety training.

Make sure all equipment has guards around moving parts.

Have numerous MSDS binders for ALL chemicals you have on the site.

Make sure 2 ways radios are functioning.

Before entering confined spaces, use a triple meter to test atmosphere, and continued testing is required while people are there. Use proper equipment for entering/existing such spaces.

Lock out/tag out.

Proper lifting techniques.

Tho we didnt handle food, hair/beard nets will be needed entering those areas.

Maintenance actions should have plans. Ensure proper PPE is available for actions that may not be routine (such as welding). There should be written instructions for putting a unit in service/taking it offline so that equipment/personnel damage does not happen.

All emergency lights/exit signs should be checked and defective ones replaced.

Hurricane/emergency evacuation plans.

Spill response protocol. Also, bio clean up kits (if an employee gets hurt and bleeds everywhere). CPR/First aid kits sufficient for the facility.

Periodic drills to gauge training effectiveness and response time.

Emergency contacts/numbers posted.

Everyone is responsible for a safe work environment. Trip/slip hazards, improper/missing lighting, leaks, sharp edges, etc... anything that could hurt you or the next guy should be reported and corrected. Encourage the employees to communicate with you
 
As someone mentioned before the OSHA 30 hour course is somewhere to start. It gives you a brief overview of expectations and depending on the instructor you get an introduction to the code of federal regulations. If your employer expects you to handle the safety aspects of your workplace they should be willing to give you what you need to do so. I know there are some college's local to me that offer it for free so if you do some research it's possible you can find the same.
 

wtucker

Senior Member
Location
Connecticut
Your Workers' Comp carrier should be able to help. Have them send their loss control rep. It's free!

If your company belongs to the Associated General Contractors, the Associated Builders and Contractors or a similar trade organization, they can help. If they have a safety committee, join it. You'll meet folks who can help.

If your company's unionized, maybe the bargaining unit can point you toward help.

Call the local OSHA area office and ask if they have a "compliance assistance specialist" or a "consultation program." The compliance assistance specialist won't be able to help you directly, but WILL be able to point you to people in your industry who can. A consultation program person can come to your site and help, without issuing citations. Check that out at www.OSHA.gov. I've used them several times, and it was always helpful and I've never regretted it. And, if there's a consultant visit going when a compliance officer shows up, the compliance officer will walk away.

Speaking of OSHA: Often, the agency participates in AGC or ABC safety committees. Getting to know and work with OSHA folks establishes your company as one that's trying--which can't hurt if there's a compliance visit.

And, you might take a look at the American Society of Safety Engineers' local chapter, www.asse.org.

Good luck.
 

mannyb

Senior Member
As someone mentioned before the OSHA 30 hour course is somewhere to start. It gives you a brief overview of expectations and depending on the instructor you get an introduction to the code of federal regulations. If your employer expects you to handle the safety aspects of your workplace they should be willing to give you what you need to do so. I know there are some college's local to me that offer it for free so if you do some research it's possible you can find the same.

i agree with taking the small steps. i will go crazy just thinking about everything needing done. i really appreciate the input.
 

mannyb

Senior Member
Some of the things that I have seen implemented in the field:

Drug testing
100% hand protection required. Cut resistant gloves 100% of the time
Required min PPE: HardHat, Glasses, hi visibility clothing, safety toe boots. 100% of the time
Weekly relevant toolbox talks documented
Require at least 1 CPR and Firstaid certified "competent" person at each jobsite
Require OSHA 10 for field and 30 for foreman
Relevant training prior to a specific scope of work: confined space, dawn doff, hot work, roof work, etc.
Pre Task Planning checklists
Stretching and Bending. Really, this is becoming more and more prevalent...
SDS and OSHA 300 properly maintained and understood
Incentives for near miss reporting
Daily "Plan of the Day" meetings with the whole crew highlighting hazards for that day.

Don't be afraid to be an Hard case. Finding your name on the porta potty walls is a badge of honor. :thumbsup:

i agree with badge of honor stuff.
 

TVH

Member
Safety meeting and requirements

Safety meeting and requirements

Management must support and participate in the process.
Hold supervisors accountable for Safety compliance.
Supervisors need to deliver the meeting with safety coordinator assisting as necessary.
Give recognition when due.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Drug testing, weeding out the smokers and keeping your heavy drinkers. But right now that is the politically correct way to do things. :roll:
 

Fulthrotl

~~Please excuse the mess. Sig under construction~~
i was designated the safety coordinator for our shop. some of our customers want to see a safety program in place and keep up with records.
i was wondering what are some of the things any shop were doing that have proven well in your shop. i know in the end its up to my shop but
i would like a better perspective with people in the industry. i dont just want input on electrical JSA. i would like to hear anything with safety.
i can be fork truck, msds, hot work permit, etc, etc. i would also like to hear, if any, something on who you would distruibute, would it be emai, app, or plain old safety meeting once a week or month. I am not going hold anyone responsible i just want to feed back on safety programs
as was mentioned.... call up the agent representing your general liability policy.
they will probably have a info packet you can have in your inbox in about ten minutes.

the main thing is documentation of the plan you implement.
if something icky happens, and you have no backup, it's almost worse than having no
plan at all.

jobsite tailgate meetings weekly, with attendees signing a roster
is a minimum... and keep a log of topics, and questions about
the job....

UA for new hires has been mandatory for years around here.
in the event of an accident, immediate UA of all people involved is
pretty much mandatory.

and this stuff starts bleeding into labor law, and employee relations.

there is a reason i'm a one man band, and i just remember what it was....
thanks for the reminder.
 

Derek D

Member
Location
Sacramento Ca.
I Can Help You

I Can Help You

i was designated the safety coordinator for our shop. some of our customers want to see a safety program in place and keep up with records.
i was wondering what are some of the things any shop were doing that have proven well in your shop. i know in the end its up to my shop but
i would like a better perspective with people in the industry. i dont just want input on electrical JSA. i would like to hear anything with safety.
i can be fork truck, msds, hot work permit, etc, etc. i would also like to hear, if any, something on who you would distruibute, would it be emai, app, or plain old safety meeting once a week or month. I am not going hold anyone responsible i just want to feed back on safety programs
If you would like some template safety programs to include an Injury and Illness Prevention Program, Lock Out Tag Out, Code of Safe Practices, hot work permits program etc. and tons of sources for safety and health meeting information I would be glad to send you anything you need. I am a safety management professional from California where we have some of the toughest laws in the Nation. Just email me and I will be glad to assist you for nothing more than a thank you.
 
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