Scope of work layout

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meaton

Member
I'm looking for basic examples of what people use or how you purpose the scope of work when bidding a job.
Also, how do most commercial projects do there payments.
I'm new to the office side of the business and trying to fake it the best I can as to not look like the fool I am.

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brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
Scope of work layout

Basically “F&I electrical system per drawings....” then list out specific things I’m providing; fixtures, gear, etc...

I list each drawing page number that applies, like “E1, E2... C-1,” etc... and any supplemental drawings. Include the date of the drawings and any revision dates.

Specify if you’re providing temp power and lighting. Also specify if you’re including conduit and boxes for other subs like HVAC and LV or fire alarm.

List out any exclusions that apply; like utility company charges, any concrete or wall patch work, etc...

If it’s a turn-key job and I have subcontractors, I list all of their scope and exclusions with mine; typically a different section for each sub-contract but I write it in with my scope instead of attaching theirs. I don’t include the name of the subcontractor unless the job specifies approved vendors, in which case you’ll have to.

As for payment, include a schedule of values for progress payments. Load it up on the front end of the contract. Usually the architect/PM will have to approve it. Add payments for stored materials like fixtures and gear, or if there is a lot of copper to buy. You’ll want to send a pay request immediately for stored materials once a contract is signed. Some contracts state the material must be stored on-site for payment. If they don’t have space for it, you’ll need to include cost of a storage unit or exclude and put it on the GC.

A lot of this is generally spelled out in the contract; you may have a copy of it included with the bid package. If not, call the GC and ask for one so you can see the terms before submitting a bid.


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oldsparky52

Senior Member
I bid a lot to owners of the property, and I just spelled out what I was doing in simple language. If I was ordering equipment I had a deposit before ordering and that deposit would cover me if I had to send the stuff back.

I just never liked working for GC's because the majority of them are underfunded and want the subs to float the job materials.

Payment terms should always be included.
 

meaton

Member
I'm not specifically bidding to anyone yet. I'm just trying to get comfortable and gain as much knowledge about the process.
One thing I never thought about when I went into business for myself, by myself, is the loss of other peoples ideas and knowledge of the trade. I know I'm not the smartest person in the room, but when I'm the only person in the room, then what.


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cdslotz

Senior Member
Basically “F&I electrical system per drawings....” then list out specific things I’m providing; fixtures, gear, etc...

I list each drawing page number that applies, like “E1, E2... C-1,” etc... and any supplemental drawings. Include the date of the drawings and any revision dates.

Specify if you’re providing temp power and lighting. Also specify if you’re including conduit and boxes for other subs like HVAC and LV or fire alarm.

List out any exclusions that apply; like utility company charges, any concrete or wall patch work, etc...

If it’s a turn-key job and I have subcontractors, I list all of their scope and exclusions with mine; typically a different section for each sub-contract but I write it in with my scope instead of attaching theirs. I don’t include the name of the subcontractor unless the job specifies approved vendors, in which case you’ll have to.

As for payment, include a schedule of values for progress payments. Load it up on the front end of the contract. Usually the architect/PM will have to approve it. Add payments for stored materials like fixtures and gear, or if there is a lot of copper to buy. You’ll want to send a pay request immediately for stored materials once a contract is signed. Some contracts state the material must be stored on-site for payment. If they don’t have space for it, you’ll need to include cost of a storage unit or exclude and put it on the GC.

A lot of this is generally spelled out in the contract; you may have a copy of it included with the bid package. If not, call the GC and ask for one so you can see the terms before submitting a bid.


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^^^This
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
I'm not specifically bidding to anyone yet. I'm just trying to get comfortable and gain as much knowledge about the process.
One thing I never thought about when I went into business for myself, by myself, is the loss of other peoples ideas and knowledge of the trade. I know I'm not the smartest person in the room, but when I'm the only person in the room, then what.


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OK, as a one-man show you're probably not tackling projects of the scope brantmacga outlined, but definitely keep his very good advice in mind. Are you specializing in one aspect of electrical work? One of the best things you can do, if you don't have the background already, is take a few small business courses at your local community college.
 
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