SHEETROCK completion necessary for final ??

rt66electric

Senior Member
Location
Oklahoma
I am having difficulty with a job.........
Commercial job.

The lady wants a final electrical inspection before payment..

The carpenter/handyman is dragging his feet and insists that the electrician can get a final, then, he can finish mud/tape/paint later.(3months or so).
There are several locations that are without sheetrock covering the devices, junction boxes, wiring, and light outlets.

Please help me find some documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for final inspection??
 
I am having difficulty with a job.........
Commercial job.

The lady wants a final electrical inspection before payment..

The carpenter/handyman is dragging his feet and insists that the electrician can get a final, then, he can finish mud/tape/paint later.(3months or so).
There are several locations that are without sheetrock covering the devices, junction boxes, wiring, and light outlets.

Please help me find some documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for final inspection??
In my neck of the woods, a final inspection won't be done until we are ready to leave and not come back. That means all the covers have to be on and not meant to come back off as a part of the project. So, if the sheetrock isn't up, that would mean no final electrical inspection here.

Your rules may vary, but I'll wager the rules are somewhat similar everywhere.

I have no love for rockers and wood butchers for what I feel is good reason. One reason is they do stuff like the above.
 
Last edited:

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
If any method of wiring requires cover of drywall or similar then it would probably need to finished. It may also be up to the AHJ. We have had plenty of small jobs like this and usually get the AHJ to sign off with conditions and have that in writing.
"Electrical final needs final for drywall repairs."

This would get you off the hook.
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
Yeah, that final payment at final inspection...............

Not to be a monkey with blue balls...................

But what if you get the electric back to not "finished" for final ?????

Remove breakers or undue splices that could "cramp up" the owner until your ready to finish because their ready.

I know you'd rather have the money......but just a thought.....
 

rald277

Member
Location
Dallas Tx
If I were in your situation I would ask the inspector straight out what he needs in this situation. I suspect he will want the sheet rock completed first. That will put the burden back on the sheet rocker where it belongs. I might even go so far as to call for a final and let it get red tagged so I had documentation.
 

growler

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,GA
Please help me find some documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for final inspection??
If I were in your situation I would ask the inspector straight out what he needs in this situation.

The AHJ issued the permit and they are the only one's that can close it out.


Is this an electrical only permit or is there a building/remodeling permit and a GC running the job?


If it were me I would strongly suggest they get a different sheetrocker and get this job completed before they start finding out what a real ass I can be under the right conditions.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
A final electrical can be done when all your work is complete. There does not need to be painting or anything else however, in some areas, they may not issue a CO (certificate of occupancy) until all work is done.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I am having difficulty with a job.........
Commercial job.

The lady wants a final electrical inspection before payment..

The carpenter/handyman is dragging his feet and insists that the electrician can get a final, then, he can finish mud/tape/paint later.(3months or so).
There are several locations that are without sheetrock covering the devices, junction boxes, wiring, and light outlets.

Please help me find some documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for final inspection??
The carpenter/handyman is the problem here. Note the letters handyman in that title. The owner likes his price and he is king of construction in her eyes.

It has been mentioned - some things may need sheetrock covering them before they can pass a final inspection. An example may be if you used any NM cable - in other than dwellings it needs to be within a 15 minute finish. No drywall - then you should not pass the final inspection.

Other items maybe could be finaled. But then AHJ maybe will want to see a new permit for when the drywall is finally installed for any changes that may be made because of adding the drywall.

I really don't think there is a universal answer and it really is more of a case by case situation here.
 

jxofaltrds

Senior Member
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
Occupation
ESI
I am having difficulty with a job.........
Commercial job.

The lady wants a final electrical inspection before payment..

The carpenter/handyman is dragging his feet and insists that the electrician can get a final, then, he can finish mud/tape/paint later.(3months or so).
There are several locations that are without sheetrock covering the devices, junction boxes, wiring, and light outlets.

Please help me find some documentation that explicitly defines the requirements for final inspection??
Then she should have 'others' finish their work.

An inspector would look at just a few examples:

312.4 Repairing Noncombustible Surfaces. Noncombustible
surfaces that are broken or incomplete shall be repaired
so there will be no gaps or open spaces greater than
3 mm (1?8 in.) at the edge of the cabinet or cutout box
employing a flush-type cover.

314.20 In Wall or Ceiling. In walls or ceilings with a
surface of concrete, tile, gypsum, plaster, or other noncombustible
material, boxes employing a flush-type cover or
faceplate shall be installed so that the front edge of the box,
plaster ring, extension ring, or listed extender will not be
set back of the finished surface more than 6 mm (1?4 in.).
In walls and ceilings constructed of wood or other combustible
surface material, boxes, plaster rings, extension
rings, or listed extenders shall be flush with the finished
surface or project therefrom.

314.21 Repairing Noncombustible Surfaces. Noncombustible
surfaces that are broken or incomplete around boxes
employing a flush-type cover or faceplate shall be repaired so
there will be no gaps or open spaces greater than 3 mm (1?8 in.) at the edge of the box.
 

Volta

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Then she should have 'others' finish their work.

An inspector would look at just a few examples:
....

314.21 Repairing Noncombustible Surfaces. Noncombustible
surfaces that are broken or incomplete around boxes
employing a flush-type cover or faceplate shall be repaired so
there will be no gaps or open spaces greater than 3 mm (1?8 in.) at the edge of the box.
Yup, they sure should. I have in fact traced the root of the basic verbiage of 314.21 to 1909, it is nothing new.

However, in 25 years, in your fine city right here, and in surrounding jurisdictions, not once can I recall an inspector asking for a wallplate to be remove to assure compliance. I wish they would, as I wish sheetrockers needed inspections for same.

Also not once have I met a GC that seemed aware of the requirement.

I do of course carry a bag of 20-minute plaster and mudpan. Hard to consider an electrician good if they don't, IMNSHO.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Yup, they sure should. I have in fact traced the root of the basic verbiage of 314.21 to 1909, it is nothing new.

However, in 25 years, in your fine city right here, and in surrounding jurisdictions, not once can I recall an inspector asking for a wallplate to be remove to assure compliance. I wish they would, as I wish sheetrockers needed inspections for same.

Also not once have I met a GC that seemed aware of the requirement.

I do of course carry a bag of 20-minute plaster and mudpan. Hard to consider an electrician good if they don't, IMNSHO.
Silicone caulk is non combustible and easier to deal with.

Combustible surfaces are not allowed any gap, I use silicone around them all the time if there is a gap, or even if the box isn't quite flush.
 

Volta

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Silicone caulk is non combustible and easier to deal with.

Combustible surfaces are not allowed any gap, I use silicone around them all the time if there is a gap, or even if the box isn't quite flush.
Well of course I consider you good, I was talking about others . . . :angel:
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Well of course I consider you good, I was talking about others . . . :angel:
Hey I am happy with drywallers that cut out every box, can, etc. or if you left a cable in a position where you wanted it to extend through, that they actually extend it through in the place you left it, and appreciate those finishers that do not leave a box nearly completely filled with mud.

As far as making mistakes cutting out, I can understand to a certain extent. But not to much extent for guys that exclusively do this and not much else. I have hung drywall myself a few times, used the rotary cutout tools, and really did not find them that hard to mess up a simple 2x4, 4x4, or 6 inch round cutout. I never twisted or broke any boxes when making such cutouts, and after a couple mistakes you find out just how to feel for the object you are cutting and generally make fairly perfect cutouts every time after that.

Problem with the hanging crews is they simply don't care, are paid by how many square feet they hang, so the faster they get done the more they made on the job and the more jobs they can get done in one day... The finishing crew can always repair their mistakes:rant: I think their boss needs to penalize them for every cutout missed, every broken box, etc. then maybe they will slow down enough to take a little more care around such items.

I do not use plastic boxes larger than 2 gang. Those are always fiberglass boxes, if the drywallers get too aggressive it breaks, the plastic ones just distort and you can not even mount devices in them sometimes because they are so distorted, or if you can mount devices they do not line up well enough for the cover to fit properly. Sometimes I still ask myself if all boxes shouldn't be fiberglass or metal, then comes the cutthroat bid reminder of most residential work, and plastic ends up being the winner, for one and two gang boxes, they can usually be straightened enough and not be a disaster on the occasions when it does happen. Three and 4 gang boxes that have been distorted usually need drywall repairs after straightening out the problem with the box.
 
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