Street light pole 5G antenna

hhsting

Senior Member
I have 5G antenna that is going to be installed on street light pole which I think is located on right of way. The cell company is bringing utility conductors and mounting main service disco with eight breakers MLO small panel 120/240V single phase on the street light pole to power their 5G cell antennas which are on street light pole.

Confusing does NEC apply grounding and bonding all the other stuff. I looked at NEC 90.2(B) but not sure and would like your opinion would above install NEC apply or it does not apply?
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I have 5G antenna that is going to be installed on street light pole which I think is located on right of way. The cell company is bringing utility conductors and mounting main service disco with eight breakers MLO small panel 120/240V single phase on the street light pole to power their 5G cell antennas which are on street light pole.

Confusing does NEC apply grounding and bonding all the other stuff. I looked at NEC 90.2(B) but not sure and would like your opinion would above install NEC apply or it does not apply?
I believe your answer is found under the FPN;

“Additional information can be found through consultation with the appropriate governmental bodies, such as state regulatory commissions, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Federal Communications Commission.”
 

hhsting

Senior Member
I believe your answer is found under the FPN;

“Additional information can be found through consultation with the appropriate governmental bodies, such as state regulatory commissions, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Federal Communications Commission.”
I don’t follow. Someone like Maryland Public Service Commission? So contact the body who owns the light pole? Also where in those bodies, who and link?
 

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
I was involved in a similar situation last year. Nat gas utility wanted to install telemetry device on a light pole owned by electrical coop.

At the end of the day, the electric coop dictated the design of the installation per their standards. No AHJ involved.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
How high will the 8 breaker MLO panel be and will it be accessible to everyone? As in is it in a fenced in area or at a height that the general public can’t have access to it?

I would say the AHJ doesn’t have any interest in it, but I would hate for it to be installed on our poles without adhering to the NEC from a liability standpoint
 

hhsting

Senior Member
How high will the 8 breaker MLO panel be and will it be accessible to everyone? As in is it in a fenced in area or at a height that the general public can’t have access to it?

I would say the AHJ doesn’t have any interest in it, but I would hate for it to be installed on our poles without adhering to the NEC from a liability standpoint
Its not in fenced area and it is mounted on metallic street light pole right of way which is on sidewalk and 5 feet 8 inches height above floor. The 8 breakers MLO panel is main service disconnect has utility service conductors on line side
 
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tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Who owns the luminaire poles?
I ask as for example, Seattle City Light installs, owns and maintains the luminaire (OK Street Light) poles and the NEC does not apply as they are a utility.
But some cities, like where I am, install, own and maintain poles per the NEC.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
Just a fine point:
We talk about installing 5G antennas, but what is really being installed is an array of inter-wired antennas, transmitters and receivers along with an upstream data path which may be cable or another RF link. It may also include battery power for some specified backup period.

Think of it as a miniature cell site rather than an antenna.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Just a fine point:
We talk about installing 5G antennas, but what is really being installed is an array of inter-wired antennas, transmitters and receivers along with an upstream data path which may be cable or another RF link. It may also include battery power for some specified backup period.

Think of it as a miniature cell site rather than an antenna.
And those that service and maintain it are pobably communications guys and not light/power electricians - I think NEC should apply even if POCO owns and maintains the light/pole.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Its not in fenced area and it is mounted on metallic street light pole right of way which is on sidewalk and 5 feet 8 inches height above floor. The 8 breakers MLO panel is main service disconnect has utility service conductors on line side
If NEC applies, is this panel listed for use as service equipment without a single main beaker being installed? Many are not and at least need a back fed main with hold down kit. If 2020 NEC applies you can no longer have multiple service disconnecting means in single section gear.

If permits are needed chances are NEC will apply.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
I'd say the NEC applies since the installation and the location are not under the exclusive control of the Telecom Utility. (The public has access, and the poles are owned by the POCO).

We had a local utility that installed some pole lights for a commercial client, and they didn't run ground wires. The local inspector insisted on ground wires, and the POCO refused. It became a long court battle.

In the end, I believe the utility won. But I feel like since the poles were installed in a public parking lot, that the ground wires should have been provided.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
I'd say the NEC applies since the installation and the location are not under the exclusive control of the Telecom Utility. (The public has access, and the poles are owned by the POCO).
....
Using that logic, the power company poles are not under the exclusive control of the power company as the general public can walk up and touch them.

I would say that if the panel has a lock, it is under the exclusive control of the key holder.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
Using that logic, the power company poles are not under the exclusive control of the power company as the general public can walk up and touch them.

I would say that if the panel has a lock, it is under the exclusive control of the key holder.
But the communications companies are listed under 90.2B4 (a single paragraph) while a utility company is listed under 90.2B5 which includes subparagraphs a through d. And subparagraph c specifically lists established easements or rights of way for utility companies, while anything similar is missing for communications companies.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I think communications exempted in 90.2(B)(5) would be communications related to POCO operations and not necessarily to general communications providers. Now if POCO was operating a public access network then they become not only a electric utility but also a communications utility.

(B)(4) exempts communications companies, but yet main power in most those facilities are covered by NEC it is the network components that are exempted. How many contractors on this site wire main power to cell sites and get inspected? Most them don't do any the communications wiring on those sites though, and it usually isn't covered by NEC.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
I think communications exempted in 90.2(B)(5) would be communications related to POCO operations and not necessarily to general communications providers. Now if POCO was operating a public access network then they become not only a electric utility but also a communications utility.

(B)(4) exempts communications companies, but yet main power in most those facilities are covered by NEC it is the network components that are exempted. How many contractors on this site wire main power to cell sites and get inspected? Most them don't do any the communications wiring on those sites though, and it usually isn't covered by NEC.
Seems like 90.2 is almost as confusing as the Facebook post I saw about which type of mushrooms you can eat.....

Person 1: This is X type of mushroom. Its safe to eat.
Person 2: No that's a Y. Don't eat those.
Person 3: That's a Z and they are delicious!
 
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