Taking Horizontally EMTs Through Metal Framing

vidividi12

Member
Location
San Marino
Occupation
Electrician
Dear All,

In our Project, metal framing will be used with metal studs and drywalls (Totally 10cm width). I am going to planning to put my 2 ea 3/4" EMT conduits through metal studs then, feed receptacles from one source. However, our architect opposes as stating that possibility of load carriage will have been damaged and we cannot take EMTs horizontally through metal framing.

I found a drawing for wood framing on Building Code but unfortunately, I couldn't find a similar drawing for metal framing. Is there any drawing or clause on building code or NEC for taking EMTs horizontally through metal framing?

1577974480435.png

Thanks from now
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
most metal studs already have cutouts that you can run your EMT through. I don't see how running EMT through them will negatively impact anything. The metal studs are not structural anyway.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
We've been running EMT horizontally through metal studs for as long as there have been metal studs without any issue.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
Having the factory holes in the studs is fine... unless you have framers that are too lazy to lay them out so they're in line with each other. I've had cases where I was never able to use two factory holes in one run of pipe.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
metal studs have pretty much no structural value. All they are is something to attach drywall to, the drywall gives the wall whatever structural value it may have and is a reason 5/8 drywall is almost always used on both sides. The top/bottom stud channels give it secure-ment to floor/ceiling to prevent lateral movement, but not much else.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
metal studs have pretty much no structural value. All they are is something to attach drywall to, the drywall gives the wall whatever structural value it may have and is a reason 5/8 drywall is almost always used on both sides. The top/bottom stud channels give it secure-ment to floor/ceiling to prevent lateral movement, but not much else.
This is true with the standard, plain-jane studs you'll find at the local yard... but they do make structural steel studs.

 
Top