Taking the exam

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
All that does is lower the quality and knowledge of the younger electricians...

It all goes back to the “everyone gets a trophy” mentality..

If it’s too hard, lower the standards so everyone gets a trophy, there are no losers..

What ever happened to failing and striving to get better??

Therin lies the stupidity..


Not sure I totally agree. When I took the test back in 1980 or so the 4000 hours was the requirement but you still needed to know the code. The highlighting helps you find the section quicker so you are not so worried about running out of time.

When I teach I tell my students they can use any means necessary to get the answer except for copying, of course. In the field they will have access to a code book so why not allow hem to use it on a test. My HS math teacher said you can write all the formulas down on paper if you want and use them for the test. You still needed to know what formula to use.

I think the hours is probably the bigger issue. IMO, 2 years isn't much experience for most people. BTW, in NYC back when my dad was taking his test you were required to have 13 years experience. I have no idea what it is now. He didn't have 13 years but he pleaded his case about having to support his kids and they let him take it with less than 13 years. At the time he was the youngest person in NYC to get his license under those rules.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
I'll be taking the test in Florida, do they let you bring Handbook version or just the NEC?


It doesn't look like you can bring either. I assume they supply the book. The following was taken from here

What to bring
Personal items are not permitted in the examination room. Any personal items such as toiletries, snacks, etc. must be encased in a clear plastic bag, no larger than 8” X 11” in size and kept in the locker provided by the vendor.
 Two forms of valid signature identification, one of which is government issued: driver’s license, state identification card, passport or military identification card. Student or employment I.D. cards and photo bearing credit cards are not acceptable as picture bearing identification. Candidates will not be admitted without showing proper identification. Your name and address must match what was submitted on your application.
 Calculators are permitted if they are silent, hand-held, battery-operated, nonprinting, and without an alphabetic keypad. Solar calculators are not recommended  To better serve our “English as a second language” candidates, the Bureau of Education and Testing is permitting the use of foreign language translation dictionaries during the examination. Translation dictionaries shall contain word-forword or phrase translations ONLY. Dictionaries that contain definitions of words, explanations of words, or handwritten notes may NOT be used.
 Electronic translation dictionaries are NOT recommended as most will have more than word-for-word or phrase translations, an alphabetic keypad, have mathematical formulas and stored memory capabilities. Should these electronic translation devices have these capabilities; these devices WILL be rejected by the Proctor or Test Center Manager in NOT being suitable for the test site environment.
 Testing Center staff will inspect and approve each dictionary before it can be used during the examination. In order to maintain security and to ensure fairness to all candidates, candidates are limited to the use of a single dictionary.  If you have any questions concerning acceptable translation dictionaries, please contact the Bureau of Education and Testing at 850.487.1395
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
you can sit for the exam when ever you pay for it but they won't grant you your license number until you meet the requirements of the state it will just sit in the department of business and regulations data base as a "pass" until you can furnish the proof of work history how ever it it only a valid score for 2-3 years I believe. I just sat for mine,
That would be nice. I would have been able to easily pass the contractor test here before I was even done with trade school, maybe even ace it, but at that time wasn't even eligible to take the journeyman test because of lack of experience.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Not sure I totally agree. When I took the test back in 1980 or so the 4000 hours was the requirement but you still needed to know the code. The highlighting helps you find the section quicker so you are not so worried about running out of time.

When I teach I tell my students they can use any means necessary to get the answer except for copying, of course. In the field they will have access to a code book so why not allow hem to use it on a test. My HS math teacher said you can write all the formulas down on paper if you want and use them for the test. You still needed to know what formula to use.

I think the hours is probably the bigger issue. IMO, 2 years isn't much experience for most people. BTW, in NYC back when my dad was taking his test you were required to have 13 years experience. I have no idea what it is now. He didn't have 13 years but he pleaded his case about having to support his kids and they let him take it with less than 13 years. At the time he was the youngest person in NYC to get his license under those rules.

I can see that being the issue for many young people today. When making those potential career decisions while still in high school, if they find out they need another 5 years after any schooling before they can get to what appears to be the top of the hill, they decide they aren't interested in this field before really knowing much about it.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Not sure I totally agree. When I took the test back in 1980 or so the 4000 hours was the requirement but you still needed to know the code. The highlighting helps you find the section quicker so you are not so worried about running out of time.

When I teach I tell my students they can use any means necessary to get the answer except for copying, of course. In the field they will have access to a code book so why not allow hem to use it on a test. My HS math teacher said you can write all the formulas down on paper if you want and use them for the test. You still needed to know what formula to use.

I think the hours is probably the bigger issue. IMO, 2 years isn't much experience for most people. BTW, in NYC back when my dad was taking his test you were required to have 13 years experience. I have no idea what it is now. He didn't have 13 years but he pleaded his case about having to support his kids and they let him take it with less than 13 years. At the time he was the youngest person in NYC to get his license under those rules.
Two years isn’t. Especially when a lot spend the first year doing grunt work..
And I see a lot get their license and immediately strike out on their own, only to be lost on the code.
I’ll be the first to admit, I’m not as familiar with the code as I once was, but I still remember the code articles from memorization from many years ago. That was a Rodriguez suggestion...
Learn the book, don’t highlight or go to the index..
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Two years isn’t. Especially when a lot spend the first year doing grunt work..
And I see a lot get their license and immediately strike out on their own, only to be lost on the code.
I’ll be the first to admit, I’m not as familiar with the code as I once was, but I still remember the code articles from memorization from many years ago. That was a Rodriguez suggestion...
Learn the book, don’t highlight or go to the index..
I look back on my situation, yes I could have passed the contractor test before I was done with trade school. No I wasn't ready at that time to take on contracting. Was still a lot I hadn't experienced. Maybe if all I were to do were single family dwellings and nothing else that would have been somewhat acceptable.

Two years after completing a post secondary program is probably fine to become a journeyman.

I was about 28 when I took contractor license exam, and went on my own shortly afterwards. Still had a lot to learn about contracting, wasn't doing too bad though with the electrical knowledge still learned stuff in that area since then as well though.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
That is the problem with getting a license after 2 years. It is hard to learn all the procedures that are required ie, permits, dealing with power company, hiring tax rules, etc.

I remember a guy who got his license with less than 2 years. His employer lied.... The guy had no idea how to schedule or setup for a service change, where to get a permit, etc. He would call me all the time to help him with these issues. At least now they do require you to learn some business info.
 
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