Testing Done by Legrand

Merry Christmas

norcal

Senior Member
Been scanning the documents, right now looking at testing 14 AWG copper clad aluminum. Why should residential electricians carry another wire size, & a additional assortment of 10A circuit breakers if added to the 2023 NEC is my question? There are more questions too.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Technician
Been scanning the documents, right now looking at testing 14 AWG copper clad aluminum. Why should residential electricians carry another wire size, & a additional assortment of 10A circuit breakers if added to the 2023 NEC is my question? There are more questions too.


Someone wants 10 amp resi circuits. Which IMO is dumb considering space heaters and upscale vacuums draw 12 amps while many hair dryers pull 15 amps.

One could argue lighting circuits but an extra home run isn't worth it when you can tap off of a receptacle.

At most it could make sense if we were to switch over to a 240 volt utilization voltage, however the rest of the world is pulling 16 and 20 amp circuits in favor of legacy 10 and 32 amp circuits.

So I can't really see it happening in a practical sense.
 

yuhong

Member
Location
Burnaby, BC
Avoids most of the mistakes made when introducing aluminum wiring in the 1960s. The current draft bans them for use in receptacle outlets altogether.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Technician
Avoids most of the mistakes made when introducing aluminum wiring in the 1960s. The current draft bans them for use in receptacle outlets altogether.


I guess for things like lighting it might work, but at the same time I personally wouldn't run a dedicated circuits for lighting- just hit up from the nearest receptacle.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
What are the 21 states that have amended the NEC to remove the AFCI requirement?

-Hal
I think that is answered here;


Illinois is listed as "No amendments to AFCI or GFCI requirements" which really isn't right because we have no statewide code.

Code adoption here is by local jurisdiction. A statewide code only applies if the local jurisdiction hasn't adopted ANY electrical code. Then it defaults to the 2008 code which has more limited AFCI requirements.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Been scanning the documents, right now looking at testing 14 AWG copper clad aluminum. Why should residential electricians carry another wire size, & a additional assortment of 10A circuit breakers if added to the 2023 NEC is my question? There are more questions too.
There is at least one poster here who thinks USB level voltages will be the norm not all that far in the future.

I think 10 Amp circuits are a solution to nothing.
 

augie47

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee
Occupation
State Electrical Inspector (Retired)
This is in the attachment and is likely what they are referening.
Little misleading as the States have not totally removed AFCI but have altered the required locations.



1626985395598.png
 

yuhong

Member
Location
Burnaby, BC
Reading the report, I wonder what exactly happens to the surge protector. Does the joules go through the MOV instead of causing joule heating or something else? I assume most of them have a thermal fuse, right?
 

mbrooke

Batteries Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Technician
Reading the report, I wonder what exactly happens to the surge protector. Does the joules go through the MOV instead of causing joule heating or something else? I assume most of them have a thermal fuse, right?



By joules they mean a high voltage surge of energy shunted by the arrestors.

Joule heating is where a high resistance at a splice causes current heating.

One words used to describe two different events.
 

yuhong

Member
Location
Burnaby, BC
By joules they mean a high voltage surge of energy shunted by the arrestors.

Joule heating is where a high resistance at a splice causes current heating.

One words used to describe two different events.
I assume that they are similar enough that they both can be detected by a surge protector, right?
 
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