To AFCI or Not

ramsy

Owner/Operator
Location
LA basin, CA
Occupation
Service Electrician 2017 NEC
I had one multiwire branch citcuit and wasnt spending the money for that one...
Back-in-the-day when electricians wired most existing construction, MWBC's were in the same-predictable locations.

Occupants with GFCI outlets at these kitchen or laundry points of use, fed by MWBC's, rarely complain about the $30 AF/GF Dual Function outlet that typically works fine, after ~100 replaced per 406.4(D)4.

Unlike the members on this forum, my clients get how utility issues can trip AFCI's, and how to unplug stuff to check it.

Internet opinion is much harder to convince what my clients experience in the field on a daily basis.

However, since I'm not a paid evangelist of AFCI's or empirical observation, I am learning to leave the internet alone.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I'm sure you already know that NJ doesn't require AFCI's on a service upgrade. That said, if you wanted to make the choice to install them for your and your family's personal protection that would be one thing but I don't think it's going to increase the value of your house at the time of sale IMHO.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I know that the use or non-use of AFCI's will not change the home's resale value but lately HI's have been noting the lack of AFCI protection especially in new panels. I don't want that to become a potential issue if selling the house down the road. In the current real estate market not much matters with very low home inventory but in a normal market buyers seem to want anything that is mentioned in an inspection report or some negotiated price reduction, that would be what I was trying to avoid.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
In the current real estate market not much matters with very low home inventory but in a normal market buyers seem to want anything that is mentioned in an inspection report or some negotiated price reduction, that would be what I was trying to avoid.
You'll never be able to avoid a negotiation so, you might as well be prepared. Real estate agents represent the buyer and they will try to get the best house for the lowest possible price. HI's also represent the buyer. They spent numerous $$$ getting their licenses, buying the best cameras and computer programs and that's why they produce 70 page reports with red arrows and high-lighted texts.

In a normal real estate market you have to carefully look at your asking price and decide what $$$ you'll settle for. In today's market you may end up seeing a bidding war and often get more $$$ than what you expected. Good luck !!!
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
You'll never be able to avoid a negotiation so, you might as well be prepared. Real estate agents represent the buyer and they will try to get the best house for the lowest possible price. HI's also represent the buyer. They spent numerous $$$ getting their licenses, buying the best cameras and computer programs and that's why they produce 70 page reports with red arrows and high-lighted texts.
I've been on both ends of the bidding war. Selling a home a few years ago we had 7 offers at the open house. Took the highest cash offer, inspection report came back with ridiculous things that the buyer wanted "fixed". We basically said no to just about everything so the deal fell through. The next buyer dragged their feet through attorney review so we cancelled the contract and took the third offer. The realtor made it clear to the third buyers that we weren't going to be fixing anything that wasn't structurally related (there were no such issues) and the deal went through.

The eye opening thing was some of the crap that these buyers thought should be negotiated to put some money in their pockets as if they buying a new house instead of a 55 year old house. :rolleyes:
 
I've been on both ends of the bidding war. Selling a home a few years ago we had 7 offers at the open house. Took the highest cash offer, inspection report came back with ridiculous things that the buyer wanted "fixed". We basically said no to just about everything so the deal fell through. The next buyer dragged their feet through attorney review so we cancelled the contract and took the third offer. The realtor made it clear to the third buyers that we weren't going to be fixing anything that wasn't structurally related (there were no such issues) and the deal went through.

The eye opening thing was some of the crap that these buyers thought should be negotiated to put some money in their pockets as if they buying a new house instead of a 55 year old house. :rolleyes:
Yeah If I ever sell a house I will not be "negotiated down" on a bunch of stupid HI stuff. :mad:
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
There is a sizable cost difference between 10 or 12 single pole CB's and 10 or 12 AFCI CB's. Thing is that from an old job I already have all of the non-AFCI CB's that I would need to do the change so if I do choose to use AFCI's I would be buying the AFCI's.

I read Dennis' post as saying he doubts adding AFCIs would increase the resale cost of your home, since it was followed by 'or make your home more sellable'

For my personal home I made sure that AFCIs could go into the new panel, but didn't install them.

I figure the technology will improve or the requirements might change, so if something forces the issue and AFCIs have to go in I am not prevented from putting them in, but if I can avoid it I will.

Jon
 
Top