Type of fault

Clna68

Member
Location
El Paso Tx
Occupation
Electrician
What can be the most reasonable answer for a circuit that has 24 Volts and 8 ohms on one end and on the other end when you turn the switch on it reads 2.4 Volts and 2 ohms
A ) Faulty Switch
B ) Shorted
C ) Open
D ) Low or faulty batteries
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
We prefer not to answer test questions. Please let us know what you think, and why you think that, and then we can comment. Also, the question does not make sense. First of all, what do you mean by one end and the other end? Also, if a circuit's switch is off, any resistance measurement will show an infinite resistance, because it will be reading across the open contacts of the switch. So I do not understand the question.
 

iceworm

Curmudgeon still using printed IEEE Color Books
Location
North of the 65 parallel
Occupation
EE (Field - as little design as possible)
68 -
Is this part of your previous thread? If so, perhaps combine them.

Adding to Charlie's post - maybe draw us a picture.

We have some on here that are really good at guessing - but not me
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
How long is it from one end to the other? If there's that much voltage drop, I'd imagine it'd be pretty long! In the model train world track power is in the 12-14 volt range (unless you're using G as in Garden-sized trains), and the wires can be a hundred feet long without major issues.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
That is all the info I was given.
A circuit does not "have" 24 volts "on one end." You can measure voltage between two points in the circuit, and get a reading of 24 volts. But what two points are you talking about? What exactly is meant by "on one end"? If you can't show us a picture of the circuit, annotated with where the measurements were taken, then we are not going to be able to help you.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Your reading ohms with voltage applied?

I agree with the others. The question doesn’t make sense
 

iceworm

Curmudgeon still using printed IEEE Color Books
Location
North of the 65 parallel
Occupation
EE (Field - as little design as possible)
That is all the info I was given.
Consider asking for an explanation of what you are looking for. Most classes have significantly better formulated homework problems than this. With the information we have, the most likely explanation is you have missed some of the information about the problem.

Then again, when you get this explained in class, let the rest of us know. We like to learn too.
 
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