Under NEC 2017, can residential electric ranges be hard wired? Does UL 858 allow? If so is no GFCI required? Has TIA 1563 been accepted?

davidlbriggs

Member
Location
Asheville, TN
Occupation
Electrical Design Engineer
Under NEC 2017, can residential electric ranges be hard wired? Does UL 858 allow? If so is no GFCI required? Has TIA 1563 been accepted?
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Hard wiring would under NEC 110.3 B
In 210.8 is the requirement for GFCI protection for outlet or receptacle?
I don’t have access to UL 858 nor the TIA status
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
To expand upon what Tom stated the electric range would need to be listed for a hardwired connection, cord and plug connection, or both. I've seen many units that were only listed for hardwired connection and came with a whip which contained high temperature conductors. I've also seen guys throw those away and install a rubber cord that might eventually burn up.

Here's some info on the TIA but this for the 2020 NEC.
 

Dennis Alwon

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Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
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Retired Electrical Contractor
Hard wiring would under NEC 110.3 B
In 210.8 is the requirement for GFCI protection for outlet or receptacle?
I don’t have access to UL 858 nor the TIA status

Tom I don't think a hard wire residential range is required to have gfci protection.
 

romex jockey

Senior Member
Location
Vermont
There's an entire hardwired philosophy that has existed for decades in the nec that trumps any non-solid EGC .........juxtaposed to the fact that ranges (ovens) are required to have a 'means of disconnect' that is lotto capable

~RJ~
 

don_resqcapt19

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Location
Illinois
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retired electrician
Proposed TIA 1563 was not passed. It did not pass ballot at CMP2. There have been a couple of GFCI TIA proposals that passed ballot at CMP2 but did not at the correlating committee. As far as I know the only one to pass at both CMP2 and the CC, and was issued by the Standards Council is 1593.
That TIA added the following language to 210.8(F).
This requirement shall become effective on January 1, 2023 for mini-split-type heating/ventilating/air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment and other HVAC units employing power conversion equipment as a means to control compressor speed.

Informational Note: Power conversion equipment is the term used to describe the components used in HVAC equipment that is commonly referred to as a variable speed drive. The use of power conversion equipment to control compressor speed differs from multistage
compressor speed control.
 

romex jockey

Senior Member
Location
Vermont
Proposed TIA 1563 was not passed. It did not pass ballot at CMP2. There have been a couple of GFCI TIA proposals that passed ballot at CMP2 but did not at the correlating committee. As far as I know the only one to pass at both CMP2 and the CC, and was issued by the Standards Council is 1593.
That TIA added the following language to 210.8(F).
maybe the correlating committee could host a few 3 martin luncheons Don? ~RJ~
 

davidlbriggs

Member
Location
Asheville, TN
Occupation
Electrical Design Engineer
I don't have the nameplate on this unit, may have tomorrow. They are 'freestanding' Frigidaire units. We are having problems with GFCI 40 Amp 2 pole breakers tripping (there are two identical ranges both doing same thing when turned on). Tripping is not immediate, may take 30 seconds and depends on how much power is turned on. Neither I or the inspector have ever seen a freestanding unit hardwired. Under 210.8 we could dispense with GFCI if hardwired. Is this in the 858 UL listing? These units are still under warranty and we have requested, thru the GC, for service technician. These units have digital control cards. Getting them to work on GFCI could be very problematic; I'm trying to confirm we have a hardwire option. This is a new community center that the owner is really anxious to get the kitchen functioning.

DB
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
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Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
The issue with ranges and ovens and tripping GFCIs is a temporary issue. The problem is that the calrod heating elements take on moisture on the long sea voyage to the US. When you first turn them on, the moisture permits enough ground fault current to flow and the GFCI trips. If you run all of the elements on high for 20-30 minutes with a standard breaker the problem will go away and then you can connect them to the GFCI.

The problem is who is going to pay for all of that extra work. I had a discussion with a NEMA rep at the eastern section meeting and he was telling me about a 400 unit apartment complex where they have this exact issue with all of the electric ranges.
 

brantmacga

Señor Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical Monke
The issue with ranges and ovens and tripping GFCIs is a temporary issue. The problem is that the calrod heating elements take on moisture on the long sea voyage to the US. When you first turn them on, the moisture permits enough ground fault current to flow and the GFCI trips. If you run all of the elements on high for 20-30 minutes with a standard breaker the problem will go away and then you can connect them to the GFCI.

The problem is who is going to pay for all of that extra work. I had a discussion with a NEMA rep at the eastern section meeting and he was telling me about a 400 unit apartment complex where they have this exact issue with all of the electric ranges.

That’s terrible. We all know exactly who it’s going to fall on. I have a good friend that is a multi family GC; I’m going to ask him tomorrow if they’re having this problem and what they are doing about it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

davidlbriggs

Member
Location
Asheville, TN
Occupation
Electrical Design Engineer
I had not heard of or considered possibility of moisture in unit. (My common sense got lost in the weeds). I'll have electrician try your 'dry out' solution tomorrow. Thanks Don.

DB
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
The OP stated that this is a residential range (I would assume in a dwelling) under the 2017 so what is the issue?
 
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