When Does 810 Part III Really Apply

Merry Christmas

Josh111

Senior Member
Location
USA
There's more cautious requirements in part III of article 800 that apply to transmitter stations. This rule is most likely meant to apply to radio stations. However, for thins like the minimum 3" separation from the building required by 810.54, there's no size of antenna that triggers this rule. Thus, a low power antenna that both transmits ad receives radio signals for the purpose of some scada control functions on a multi-building campus might be required to comply? Or is there a definition of "transmitting station" somewhere else (not in the NEC) that can help to differentiate when these rules might have been intended to apply?
 

Josh111

Senior Member
Location
USA
After they finally showed me the cutsheets, it's "radio" antennas just like a wifi signal booster. Don't know that the 810/820 rules were really fully made for this but also the scope of the article could be more clear on what it is/isn't made to cover.
 

K8MHZ

Senior Member
Location
Michigan. It's a beautiful peninsula, I've looked
Occupation
Electrician
After they finally showed me the cutsheets, it's "radio" antennas just like a wifi signal booster. Don't know that the 810/820 rules were really fully made for this but also the scope of the article could be more clear on what it is/isn't made to cover.
I think that "Part III. Amateur and Citizen Band Transmitting and Receiving Stations - Antenna Systems" is pretty clear. FWIW, Amateur stations are covered by FCC Part 97 and Citizen Band stations are covered by FCC Part 95. 810 Part III only covers Part 97 and Part 95 installations. FWIW I have been a licensed Amateur Radio Operator for more than 25 years.

Now you are bringing 820 into the question. That's a separate section that covers community antenna television systems.

If the devices you are installing are FCC Part 15 (there should be a sticker) then nothing in 800 covers those.
 

K8MHZ

Senior Member
Location
Michigan. It's a beautiful peninsula, I've looked
Occupation
Electrician
FWIW, all man made antennas are radio antennas. Even TV is radio. I could be more help if I could see the sticker on the device. Bear in mind that some radio devices made in China are not legal to use in the US, even though they are sold here and may not have an FCC sticker. Or they may have a fake one. That would be my biggest concern.
 

tallgirl

Senior Member
Location
Great White North
Occupation
Controls Systems firmware engineer
FWIW, all man made antennas are radio antennas. Even TV is radio. I could be more help if I could see the sticker on the device. Bear in mind that some radio devices made in China are not legal to use in the US, even though they are sold here and may not have an FCC sticker. Or they may have a fake one. That would be my biggest concern.
All wires running anything other than continuous pure DC are antennas.

There are things that are unintentional radiators that don't require FCC stickers. Since it's a WiFi booster (?), definitely make sure it has a proper FCC sticker.
 
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