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    #16
    Originally posted by hbiss View Post
    There are many full power stations that, on 2/17, will be moving from their current UHF channel space to a VHF channel space. Some of them will move to where their analog broadcast currently is and others to a different VHF channel.

    Not that I don't believe you but do you have a source for that information? This is why this whole thing is so confusing- you talk to 5 different people (or read 5 different articles) and you get 5 different stories.

    I understood that all VHF channels between 54 and 216Mhz will be abandoned with the exception of the FM radio band- 88-108Mhz. Also some low power VHF stations will be allowed to remain for a period of time as long as they go digital. Possibly that is what you saw- the UHF's will change to low power VHF.

    The displaced VHF stations, changed to digital can relocate to the UHF band between 470 and 700Mhz if they aren't there already.

    -Hal
    I used to think that as well.

    http://www.rabbitears.info/market.php

    A few of those stations are WABC & WPIX in New York, KABC in Los Angeles, and WBBM & WLS in Chicago. Not exactly LPTV stations. Originally, our Fox affiliate was scheduled to go back to channel 13 (current analog location), but then they applied to remain at their DTV channel space (28)(approved).

    I just did a scan over the weekend and found an LPTV station that just fired up their digital transmission on channel 10. I guess they could move to their analog location post 2/17, though.
    CIAO!

    Ed N.

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      #17
      Originally posted by realolman View Post
      Get one about 40 foot square on a 100' mast. I don't know anyone around here can pick them up, even though they could pick up 6 vhf stations over the air in from a 90 mile radius before

      I am not promising this will help you but I found it worth wile.

      If you follow the instructions it will determine what size and type of antenna you need and if they recommend a booster and or rotator.



      Start at this site, and enter your full address; the site calculates your precise latitude and longitude. Jot down the decimal values and be sure to note direction (North or South for latitude, East or West for longitude). Then, go to this page and enter your latitude and longitude values to determine your magnetic declination. Now comes the fun part: Point your browser to the payoff page and enter your latitude, longitude, and declination values. Then, just plug in an appropriate distance range (no more than 80 miles), and view your results. You can choose to have the stations organized by their distance or direction in relation to your address, or by channel.
      The above quote came from Crutchfield



      In my area I can get both Boston MA and Providence RI stations but I will likely need a rotator to get the best reception. I have cable and plan to keep it but I already watch HDTV on this PC with a set of Rabbit ears, the picture and sound blows away my analog cable.

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        #18
        Thanks englsn.

        I see here in the NYC area three stations are eliminating their (I guess experimental) UHF digital counterparts and moving them down to their traditional VHF analog slot. (So I guess the FCC has changed it's policy once again.) So for people who have reception of those stations now all they need do is get one of those converters or better yet a new HD set.

        -Hal

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          #19
          I have this antenna. I live in a relatively flat area, and pick up stations within a 60 mile radius. I get 18 digital channels and 20 after feb. 17th.

          It has a built-in amplifier and rotator.


          Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

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            #20
            In my area I can get both Boston MA and Providence RI stations but I will likely need a rotator to get the best reception. I have cable and plan to keep it but I already watch HDTV on this PC with a set of Rabbit ears, the picture and sound blows away my analog cable.
            Thanks for the advice... I followed those instructions and found that there are 20 stations within 80 mile of where I live.

            There seems to me to be a bit of an elephant in the room. The problem is not the number of stations, or antennas, or converters, but the broadcast power. They don't seem have any power. On the site Iwire linked , they have patterns of their coverage area in analog... I'd be real interested in seeing the digital coverage area posted right beside it.... real interested.

            No question the picture is great... the public television station is beautiful. but if you got the broadcast power of a garage door opener remote, it ain't gonna cover much area. I asked before... since when does public television have more power than commercial? Since commercial pretty much turned it off... I think to collect subscription fees. And satellite providers aren't even allowed to provide stations that are available now, in analog over the air, since they are out of your "viewing area" :mad:
            Last edited by realolman; 12-29-08, 07:45 PM.
            Everything I say is fully substantiated by my own opinion

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by egnlsn View Post
              Or a TV set with an ATSC tuner.
              Umm, good point.

              Shows how fat my wallet is.
              Now is the only time you own. Live, love, toil with a will. Place no faith in time for the clock may soon be still.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by chris kennedy View Post
                I have a rabbit ears guy that is looking for an antenna for reception of digital signals come February. Any recommendations?

                Thank you.
                I don't understand all of this hype about the big switch? Won't this only affect people that don't subscribe to any cable or satellite? I would imagine that most people in this day and age have some sort of cable or satellite that they subscribe to and they won't be affected.

                Also congrats to your Dolphins Chris. I hope they beat Baltimore.
                Just in terms of allocation of time resources, religion is not very efficient. There's a lot more I could be doing on a Sunday morning. -Bill Gates

                Comment


                  #23
                  The nearest cable gets to my house is 10 miles away! I've had the big analog satelite dishs before they scrambled everything, Seen the space shuttle blow up live on the Nasa video feed. Got one of the first DirecTV dishes when satelite went digital, now I have an antenna that looks like one of those Imperial battle cruisers from Star Wars. It's been the cheapest I have done so far. As far as the channel frequencies go, I've heard that some stations will return to vhf after the switch. It is much cheaper for the stations to do this, as it does not take as much wattage to transmit the the same distance on the lower frequencies.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Won't this only affect people that don't subscribe to any cable or satellite?

                    That is correct.

                    I would imagine that most people in this day and age have some sort of cable or satellite that they subscribe to.

                    We would think so but that is not always true. Old people are one group that refuses to have cable or satellite. Then there are those who may have one sat receiver or cable box with other, less important sets still connected to an antenna. So they are out there.

                    -Hal

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by realolman View Post
                      The problem is not the number of stations, or antennas, or converters, but the broadcast power. They don't seem have any power.
                      I e-mailed my local PBS station about this because I can't pick up their digital transmission. They replied that after the switch they will increase power. They currently are broadcasting at limited power to keep from interfering with another station in the area; because of the switch, some stations are having to change their channels (their virtual channel numbers remain the same) and for those already broadcasting in digital, this can be a problem right now.



                      Originally posted by realolman View Post
                      And satellite providers aren't even allowed to provide stations that are available now, in analog over the air, since they are out of your "viewing area" :mad:
                      That's because the stations lobbied for a law to prevent you from watching advertising and news from out-of-area to protect themselves. The only way you can get out-of-area programming is if the sat provider doesn't have a retransmit agreement with the stations in your DMA, and you cannot receive their signal w/ an antenna. The local station has to sign a waiver 'releasing' you to receive programming from another DMA; and right now I think your only options are LA and ATL stations if you fall in that category.

                      I live in what I like to call a "sweet spot"; within the overlap of two DMA's. Its nice for sports because one DMA carries the falcons and braves, and the other carries the jaguars, bucs, and devil rays. Plus with the various sub-channels, I get a lot of varied programming.
                      Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by hbiss;977851

                        I would imagine that most people in this day and age have some sort of cable or satellite that they subscribe to.[/I

                        We would think so but that is not always true. Old people are one group that refuses to have cable or satellite. Then there are those who may have one sat receiver or cable box with other, less important sets still connected to an antenna. So they are out there.

                        -Hal
                        I'm sure I'm in the odd minority. When our first son arrived ten years ago we ditched the cable. The kids dont miss it a bit. :grin:
                        Now is the only time you own. Live, love, toil with a will. Place no faith in time for the clock may soon be still.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by hillbilly1 View Post
                          ...As far as the channel frequencies go, I've heard that some stations will return to vhf after the switch. It is much cheaper for the stations to do this, as it does not take as much wattage to transmit the the same distance on the lower frequencies.
                          The Des Moines stations that are analog VHF will go back to their VHF channels for digital after the switch. We're glad to...no more water-cooled tubes, no more 30kv beam power supplies, and we'll be saving thousands of $$ each month on our power bill. :cool:
                          Gregg

                          I'm just here for the pictures!

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by steelersman View Post
                            I don't understand all of this hype about the big switch? Won't this only affect people that don't subscribe to any cable or satellite? I would imagine that most people in this day and age have some sort of cable or satellite that they subscribe to and they won't be affected.
                            The guy in question is my brother. He is pretty exclusive to PBS and does not watch the box habitually. A couple of the locally transmitted PBS stations are not available here on cable or sat.

                            He has done his homework as far as bands and distance and I am pretty sure he will be happy with an indoor by either Winegard or Channelmaster.

                            Again, thanks all for the replies, I'll let you know what he gets and how well it works here.

                            Also congrats to your Dolphins Chris. I hope they beat Baltimore.
                            Thanks Garth. If we lose it was still a special season!

                            Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                            Old people are one group that refuses to have cable or satellite.
                            Hey now!

                            Comment


                              #29
                              The Des Moines stations that are analog VHF will go back to their VHF channels for digital after the switch.

                              Grich, egnlsn, if you dig down in rabbitears.org it looks like when they do they will be greatly reducing their power.

                              Isn't that in keeping with only allowing low power stations to remain in the VHF band?

                              -Hal

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Don't wait too long to get your $40 coupons ...

                                For those who have procrastinated in getting their Gov't coupons, here is some bad news:

                                "... U.S. consumers who wait too long to request government coupons to subsidize converter boxes for the digital television transition in February may come up empty-handed, a regulator has warned...."

                                Full story here.

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