10/3, 8/3 and 6/3 Without Ground Romex

James L

Senior Member
Location
Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
Occupation
Electrician
I started out in the field in 1982. We would run 6/3 SE aluminum for three wire ranges and 10/3 romex for three wire dryers. The egc on the dryer would be doubled up with the neutral or screwed to the tomb stone chaise.
I've never run AL for appliances, but seen it a bunch. I guess my early bosses thought it was just easier to keep a roll of 8/3 in the van.

About 10 years ago I worked a short stint for a hack contractor, trying to save every penny he could, no matter how. I did a finish first, and was horrified to see 8/2-g to a range, from a subpanel no less, and the bare landed on the ground bar 🤬🤬
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I've never run AL for appliances, but seen it a bunch. I guess my early bosses thought it was just easier to keep a roll of 8/3 in the van.

About 10 years ago I worked a short stint for a hack contractor, trying to save every penny he could, no matter how. I did a finish first, and was horrified to see 8/2-g to a range, from a subpanel no less, and the bare landed on the ground bar 🤬🤬
I started working in this trade in 1987. My first boss was pretty good with code knowledge, yet we still ran quite a bit of 2 wire with ground mostly to dryers, the ranges we usually ran #6 SEU which would have been code compliant anyway.
 

James L

Senior Member
Location
Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
Occupation
Electrician
It does, or did seem strange when a conductor connected to an exposed metal cabinet had to be insulated.
the biggest benefit, IMHO, is that it is readily identified as a current-carrying conductor.

If someone is in the panel and they think they are looking at an air conditioner Home Run, they might disconnect the ground wire so as to move it and make room for another wire. But if it turns out it is a dryer and it has current on it , they're going to get lit up
 
I don't know how long ago for certain, but a switch in a non metallic box didn't need to bond the yoke unless you were installing a metallic plate on it. Maybe sometime in 1990's they required bonding the yoke regardless.
Yeah I've seen that quite a bit on installations that arnt that old. But it seems like a 3 prong outlet would need an EGC and those have been around forever. Maybe lighting only circuits with the last to not really need an EGC?
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
the biggest benefit, IMHO, is that it is readily identified as a current-carrying conductor.

If someone is in the panel and they think they are looking at an air conditioner Home Run, they might disconnect the ground wire so as to move it and make room for another wire. But if it turns out it is a dryer and it has current on it , they're going to get lit up
That makes perfect, logical sense. :unsure:


Stop that! 🙃
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Electricity
There was a lot of that around here up until mid 1990's. Not as much dwelling inspections before then, and was more non qualified (or at least fewer with extensive code knowledge) wiring these places back then as well.

For me it was until the late 2000s. Until I joined electrical forums I literally believed 3 wire subpanels were legal. As well as 10-2 and 6-2 with ground range and dryer circuits prior to the change.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Electricity
For sure. Anything that was ungrounded would be wired on the end of the circuit.

We used to use 14/3 plain for 3-way travelers. I remember when we started using grounded 14/3 and guys were cutting off the ground wire even with the sheathing. We were being told, and then telling others, don't cut that off. That's a neutral if we ever need one 😅😅😅
Wait- you didn't ground the yoke? I've never seen that not done before.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Electricity
I've never run AL for appliances, but seen it a bunch. I guess my early bosses thought it was just easier to keep a roll of 8/3 in the van.

About 10 years ago I worked a short stint for a hack contractor, trying to save every penny he could, no matter how. I did a finish first, and was horrified to see 8/2-g to a range, from a subpanel no less, and the bare landed on the ground bar 🤬🤬
That was common around here. We (me included) had no idea the neutral needed to be insulated. For us there was no debate on where to land it because the subpanels in condos always had a 3 wire feed typically SEU. Basically if it wasn't a 15 or 20 amp 120 volt circuit ground and neutral were one.
 

DBoone

Senior Member
Location
Mississippi
Occupation
General Contractor
Lots of guys here still don't. Some guys pigtail a ground on the rough-in makeup, then cut it or roll it back in the box when they put the device in.

Others don't even have any pretense, and never pigtial a ground for switches.

Most of the inspectors don't really have any idea what they're looking at, either. Many only know what they learned in their "weekly video code update" or however they're doing it
Same here
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Electricity
It does, or did seem strange when a conductor connected to an exposed metal cabinet had to be insulated.
That was the same logic which I used. I figured if its going to ground the can, chassis, j-box, ect it made no sense in being insulated. I argued once with a guy who actually knew the code insisting that the neutral had to be insulated... I regret being so hard headed now finding out he was right... live and be humbled.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Wait- you didn't ground the yoke? I've never seen that not done before.
Before you didn't have to bond the yoke you could purchase switches with and without a grounding screw.

I know early on in my career we almost never bonded yoke on switches even if switch had the screw, pretty certain code didn't require bonding it unless you were using a metal wall plate.
 

mbrooke

Batteries Not Included
Location
United States
Occupation
Electricity
Before you didn't have to bond the yoke you could purchase switches with and without a grounding screw.

I know early on in my career we almost never bonded yoke on switches even if switch had the screw, pretty certain code didn't require bonding it unless you were using a metal wall plate.

I've heard that but didn't think it was real in the sense if it had the screw you had to bound it.
 

DBoone

Senior Member
Location
Mississippi
Occupation
General Contractor
Before you didn't have to bond the yoke you could purchase switches with and without a grounding screw.

I know early on in my career we almost never bonded yoke on switches even if switch had the screw, pretty certain code didn't require bonding it unless you were using a metal wall plate.
What I would like to know is what was the substantiation for requiring yoke straps on switches to be bonded
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
What I would like to know is what was the substantiation for requiring yoke straps on switches to be bonded
Don't tell anyone, I still don't bond them when in a PVC box with PVC cover (external operator type covers)

I think they decided cover screws are typically metallic and could still become energized if the yoke became energized. Personally still think isn't that big of an issue in a dwelling when there aren't any grounded surfaces in the vicinity, but I also don't think you can come up with any explanation that a CMP would ever accept to revert this rule.
 
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