2014 NEC GFCI requirements

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
This is what I have for the 2014 NEC and its new GFCI requirements...did I miss any?
? 210.8 (A)(9) Bathtubs
? 210.8 (A)(10) Laundry
? 210.8 (D) Dishwashers
? 422.51 Vending Machines
? 422.23 Tire Inflation Equipment
? 445.20 Portable Generators
 

LEO2854

Esteemed Member
Location
Ma
This is what I have for the 2014 NEC and its new GFCI requirements...did I miss any?
? 210.8 (A)(9) Bathtubs
? 210.8 (A)(10) Laundry
? 210.8 (D) Dishwashers
? 422.51 Vending Machines
? 422.23 Tire Inflation Equipment
? 445.20 Portable Generators
.


That looks about right,how about "automotive vacuum machines" I thought I read that in 422.23.
 
Last edited:

LEO2854

Esteemed Member
Location
Ma
I thought vending machines were required to have GFCI protection already.

I thought so too,but,we have too look it up.:lol:


2011 NEC.
422.51 Cord-and-Plug-Connected Vending Machines. Cord-and-plug-connected vending machines manufactured or remanufactured on or after January 1, 2005, shall include a ground-fault circuit interrupter as an integral part of the attachment plug or be located within 300 mm (12 in.) of the attachment plug. Older vending machines manufactured or remanufactured prior to January 1, 2005, shall be connected to a GFCI-protected outlet.
Informational Note,For further information, see ANSI/UL 541-2005, Standard for Refrigerated Vending Machines, or ANSI/UL 751-2005, Standard for Vending Machines.
So it looks like it started in the 2002 NEC....Not sure though.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
This is what I have for the 2014 NEC and its new GFCI requirements...did I miss any?
? 210.8 (A)(9) Bathtubs
? 210.8 (A)(10) Laundry
? 210.8 (D) Dishwashers
? 422.51 Vending Machines
? 422.23 Tire Inflation Equipment
? 445.20 Portable Generators
I have not seen 2014 requirements yet, have read about laundry and dishwashers (I think disposers are in there also).

Vending machines - there have been past requirements, maybe there has been some changes to what was already there.

Tire inflation equipment - I would hope has a definition of what is to be included, or any air compressor would potentially be covered, my first guess may be self service tire inflation equipment you see at gas stations or convenience stores is what may be intended.

Automotive vacuum machines - I also would hope would have a definition of what this intends to cover. I am thinking many of them are already covered by the vending machine section, but maybe they intend to include similar machines that do not take a form of payment to use the machine, which would disqualify it from being a vending machine.

Portable generators - unless connected to a premises wiring system doesn't have any business being in the NEC. GFCI's on the portable generator (or the absence of them) should be a listing issue and not an NEC issue. JMO.
 

joebell

Senior Member
Location
New Hampshire
The rules requiring GFCI protection for vending machines have been in the code for a few cycles now, it looks like they organized the language a bit by adding an subpart (A) & (B) for the 2 seperate conditions
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Portable generators - unless connected to a premises wiring system doesn't have any business being in the NEC. GFCI's on the portable generator (or the absence of them) should be a listing issue and not an NEC issue. JMO.
If we are talking about the 120/240 volt receptacles on portables being GFCI protected I agree with you 100% . If the NEC is going to require manufacturers to make all 120/240 receptacles on portable generators GFCI protected I envision the following, bearing in mind the adage that "desperate times call for desperate measures" :
  • obviously these generators will not be able to be connected to premise wiring as the GFCI breaker will trip as soon as the power cord is connected
  • portable generator sales will plummet
  • average homeowners will go to extraordinary lengths to try and circumvent the GFCI feature
In the last 2 years we here, on the east coast, have seen at least 3 major power outages that have lasted for several days to several weeks. It would be naive of us to believe that all people who experience this type of outage would just pack up a suitcase and go to a motel for the duration of the outage. I can't begin to tell you the Rube Goldberg things that I've seen homeowners do to get power to their houses, including a 100', 16 ga. extension cord laying across an active roadway connected to their neighbor's generator.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
This is what I have for the 2014 NEC and its new GFCI requirements...did I miss any?
? 210.8 (A)(9) Bathtubs
? 210.8 (A)(10) Laundry
? 210.8 (D) Dishwashers
? 422.51 Vending Machines
? 422.23 Tire Inflation Equipment
? 445.20 Portable Generators
Can GFCI or AFCI main breakers be far behind :?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
If we are talking about the 120/240 volt receptacles on portables being GFCI protected I agree with you 100% . If the NEC is going to require manufacturers to make all 120/240 receptacles on portable generators GFCI protected I envision the following, bearing in mind the adage that "desperate times call for desperate measures" :
  • obviously these generators will not be able to be connected to premise wiring as the GFCI breaker will trip as soon as the power cord is connected
  • portable generator sales will plummet
  • average homeowners will go to extraordinary lengths to try and circumvent the GFCI feature
In the last 2 years we here, on the east coast, have seen at least 3 major power outages that have lasted for several days to several weeks. It would be naive of us to believe that all people who experience this type of outage would just pack up a suitcase and go to a motel for the duration of the outage. I can't begin to tell you the Rube Goldberg things that I've seen homeowners do to get power to their houses, including a 100', 16 ga. extension cord laying across an active roadway connected to their neighbor's generator.
Kind of seems as though maybe the generator manufacturers are behind this code doesn't it? Why sell portables when you can make it code for people to install permanent generators that will generally cost more?

There is nothing wrong with portable generators with no bond of the neutral to the frame. It is simply an ungrounded system. You can fault any conductor to "ground" and all you have really done is make it a grounded system, there is no fault current until a second system conductor is also "grounded". You can put a GFCI receptacle on it if you want, but it is never going to trip until something becomes grounded, and even then it will not trip until there is a second fault on another system conductor, as that is the only way there will ever be a possibility for unbalanced current to flow through the GFCI sensing coil. Now connect that same generator to a premises wiring system and the neutral becomes bonded via the premises wiring system and operates very much the same way as utility power does, what is the danger in either situation?
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Nothing prohibits that now, but most users would not like losing everything when only one circuit needs to be interrupted.
I tend to agree with you. However, while most users like the AFCI and GFCI protection features most don't want to pay the exorbitant $$ required for that protection. I sometimes get the uneasy feeling that we are heading for AFCI and/or GFCI protection for all circuits on service upgrades. If not the next NEC cycle then perhaps 1 or 2 more cycles down the line. I hope I'm wrong.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I tend to agree with you. However, while most users like the AFCI and GFCI protection features most don't want to pay the exorbitant $$ required for that protection. I sometimes get the uneasy feeling that we are heading for AFCI and/or GFCI protection for all circuits on service upgrades. If not the next NEC cycle then perhaps 1 or 2 more cycles down the line. I hope I'm wrong.
As far as the consumer goes there are mostly just two types the ones that are easily scared into getting the protection whether necessary or not, and those that just want cheap, and will say we got by without that before.
 

joebell

Senior Member
Location
New Hampshire
Are they going to make us put in a gfci for dishwashers and disposals?
210.8(D) will require "outlets" supplying dishwashers to be GFCI protected. The key word is outlets ,so even hard wiring this appliance will require the protection. As for disposals, at our last IAEI chapter meeting we had the chair of CMP-2 discussing changes in art. 210 and it looks as though a "receptacle" installed for the disposal will require GFCI protection due to the rewording of 210.8(7). But unlike the dishwasher this only applies to a receptacle application, if you hard wired the disposal no protection is required.
 
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