250.104

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electricmanscott

Senior Member
Cavie said:
I simply sugest it be done in a more accessable mannor and most do not complain and agree. I do not insist it not be done. It is accessable in the attic.

But what gives you "design" authority? :-?

Accessible is accessible plain and simple.

As far as I'm concerned if I do an installation to code all I want from you is a pass or fail. Not an "Ok thats fine but I like it this way...."

If you want it done your way than when you are doing the job you can do it your way.

Maybe I've just had to much experience with know it all, my way is better inspectors. :D
 

benaround

Senior Member
normbac,

We are talking about GAS pipes, so the oven that you refered to is a gas

oven, the kind that requires 120vac recpt. for ignighter,clock,or light.

When you plug the cord into the recpt. , the #12 EGC of that circuit is a

compliant way to bond the gas piping system. That's why Dennis said, if

you unplug the oven (stove) the gas pipe bond goes away.

Another example would be a GAS furnace, the EGC of the circuit that feeds

the furnace is allowed as the gas pipe system bond.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Dennis Alwon said:
If one only has a gas range and it is plugged into a 15 or 20 amp receptace then the gas pipe is directly bonded thru that circuit. If the gas stove is unplugged then the bonding disappears.
Yes, but if the range is the only gas appliance, and it is unplugged, the equipment that "may energize the piping" is disconnected at the same time that the bonding disappears.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
LarryFine said:
Yes, but if the range is the only gas appliance, and it is unplugged, the equipment that "may energize the piping" is disconnected at the same time that the bonding disappears.
I thought about that but what if a wire in the crawl space or somewhere accidentally energizes the pipe? It does happen. I have been knocked on my butt in a crawl space because a wire was shorting to the duct.
 

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Dennis Alwon said:
I thought about that but what if a wire in the crawl space or somewhere accidentally energizes the pipe? It does happen. I have been knocked on my butt in a crawl space because a wire was shorting to the duct.

Yes, but is it likely to energize a pipe? Probably not like an appliance actually hooked up to the gas and electric supply...
 

walkerj

Senior Member
Dennis Alwon said:
I thought about that but what if a wire in the crawl space or somewhere accidentally energizes the pipe? It does happen. I have been knocked on my butt in a crawl space because a wire was shorting to the duct.
That is the exact rean i direct romex around any gas line, metal water pipe, A/C duct, ornailer plates on engineered joists.
Not required but good practice
 

normbac

Senior Member
benaround said:
normbac,

We are talking about GAS pipes, so the oven that you refered to is a gas

oven, the kind that requires 120vac recpt. for ignighter,clock,or light.

When you plug the cord into the recpt. , the #12 EGC of that circuit is a

compliant way to bond the gas piping system. That's why Dennis said, if

you unplug the oven (stove) the gas pipe bond goes away.

Another example would be a GAS furnace, the EGC of the circuit that feeds

the furnace is allowed as the gas pipe system bond.
Thanks for the reply inspectors around here are misreading the code they require bonding to the gas pipe and it is not a local requirement they are just misinterpreting 250.104 (B) It is so common that all the tact homes are done this way usually at the gas water heater. I guess its time to call em out on this one :cool:
 
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