AFCI - GFCI ins 2014 NEC

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Sorry, don't know for certain what all the changes are, but did find it rather funny to see your question and then an ad for products that probably contain the answer at the bottom of the page :D
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
From the draft copy.
210.8(A)...
(9) Bathtubs or shower stalls ? Where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the
bathtub or shower stall. [ROP 2?46]
(10) Laundry areas [ROP 2?47]
210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required in 210.12(A) and (B). The arc-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
[ROP 2?116]
(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected as described by (1), (2), (3), or (4).[ROP 2?80, ROP 2?82a, ROP 2?85]
(1) A listed combination type arc-fault circuit interrupter, installed to provide protection of the entire branch circuit.
[ROP 2?92]
(2) A listed outlet branch circuit type arc-fault circuit interrupter installed at the first outlet on the branch circuit
where all of the following conditions are met: [ROP 2?92]
a. The branch circuit over current protection device shall be a listed circuit breaker having an instantaneous
trip not exceeding 300 amperes. [ROP 2?92]
b. The branch circuit wiring shall be continuous from the branch circuit overcurrent device to the outlet
branch circuit arc-fault circuit interrupter.[ROP 2?92]
c. The maximum length of the branch circuit wiring from the branch circuit overcurrent device to the first outlet shall not exceed 15.2 m (50 ft) for a 14 AWG or 21.3 m (70 ft) for a 12 AWG conductor- .[ROP 2?92]
d. The first outlet box in the branch circuit shall be identified.[ROP 2?92]
(3) A listed outlet branch circuit type arc-fault circuit interrupter installed at the first outlet on the branch circuit
where the portion of the branch circuit between the branch-circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet is
installed using RMC, IMC, EMT, Type MC, or steel armored Type AC cables meeting the requirements of
250.118 and using metal outlet and junction boxes. [ROP 2?92]
(4) A listed outlet branch circuit type arc-fault circuit interrupter installed at the first outlet on the branch circuit
where the portion of the branch circuit between the branch-circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet is
installed using a listed metal or nonmetallic conduit or tubing encased in not less than 50 mm (2 in.) of concrete.
[ROP 2?92]
Exception No. 1: If RMC, IMC, EMT, Type MC, or steel armored Type AC cables meeting the requirements of
250.118, metal wireways, metal auxiliary gutters, and metal outlet and junction boxes are installed for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch-circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install an outlet branch-circuit type AFCI at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit. [ROP 2?102]
Exception No. 2: Where a listed metal or nonmetallic conduit or tubing or Type MC Cable is encased in not less than 50 mm (2 in.) of concrete for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch-circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install an outlet branch-circuit type AFCI at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit. [ROP 2?103]
Exception No. 3: Where an individual branch circuit to a fire alarm system installed in accordance with 760.41(B) or 760.121(B) is installed in RMC, IMC, EMT, or steel sheathed cable, Type AC or Type MC, meeting the requirements of 250.118, with metal outlet and junction boxes, metal wireways or metal auxiliary gutters, AFCI protection shall be permitted to be omitted. [ROP 2?109]
Informational Note No. 1: For information on types of arc-fault circuit interrupters, see UL 1699-2011, Standard for Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters. [ROP 2?92]
Informational Note No. 2: See 29.6.3(5) of NFPA 72- 2010, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, for information
related to secondary power supply requirements for smoke alarms installed in dwelling units. [ROP 2?92]
Informational Note No. 3: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for power-supply requirements for fire alarm systems.
[ROP 2?92]
(B) Branch Circuit Extensions or Modifications ? Dwelling Units. In any of the areas specified in 210.12(A),
where branch-circuit wiring is modified, replaced, or extended, the branch circuit shall be protected by one of the
following:
(1) A listed combination-type AFCI located at the origin of the branch circuit (2) A listed outlet branch-circuit type AFCI located at the first receptacle outlet of the existing branch circuit Exception: AFCI protection shall not be required where the extension of the existing conductors is not more than 1.8 m (6 ft.) and does not include any additional outlets or devices. [ROP 2?115]
I don't what, if anything, was changed at the ROP, annual meeting or by Standards Council.
 

texie

Senior Member
Location
Fort Collins, Colorado
Occupation
Electrician, Contractor, Inspector
Can anyone give me a quick summary of the 2014 NEC for whats changed with
AFCIs
GFCIs
Thanks
Tom
New requirement GFCI: Any outlet within 6 feet of kitchen sink. Includes under counter, etc. Dwelling unit dishwasher also required. Within 6 feet of a tube or shower.
A lot of harping through out the code about all GFCI devices must be readily accessible.

AFCI: Every thing except the garage and bathroom. There are 6 different means of achieving the required AFCI protection and is long and complicated. There will be problems here.


Above from the published 2014 NEC.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
New requirement GFCI: Any outlet within 6 feet of kitchen sink. Includes under counter, etc. Dwelling unit dishwasher also required. Within 6 feet of a tube or shower.
A lot of harping through out the code about all GFCI devices must be readily accessible.

AFCI: Every thing except the garage and bathroom. There are 6 different means of achieving the required AFCI protection and is long and complicated. There will be problems here.


Above from the published 2014 NEC.
By any outlet do you mean "any outlet" or just "receptacle outlets"? I am also guessing just 15 and 20 amp 120 volt circuits.

Dishwasher must be GFCI, or only if supplied via cord and plug?
 

texie

Senior Member
Location
Fort Collins, Colorado
Occupation
Electrician, Contractor, Inspector
By any outlet do you mean "any outlet" or just "receptacle outlets"? I am also guessing just 15 and 20 amp 120 volt circuits.

Dishwasher must be GFCI, or only if supplied via cord and plug?
I should have been more precise. I should have said receptacles 15 and 20 amp/125 volt. But for the dishwasher it is outlet, not receptacle, so even a hard wired DW will require GFCI.
 

curt swartz

Electrical Contractor - San Jose, CA
Location
San Jose, CA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Providing GFCI and AFCI protection is going to be interesting for loads such as dishwashers, disposals and even microwaves. Most of my customers are not going to accept visible blank face GFCI's. I think the breakers manufactures need to start offering the option of breakers that offer both AFCI and GFCI protection similar to what Cutler-Hammer offered when the first generation of AFCI's came out.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Providing GFCI and AFCI protection is going to be interesting for loads such as dishwashers, disposals and even microwaves. Most of my customers are not going to accept visible blank face GFCI's.
And under the new rules would a blank face GFCI inside the cabinet under the sink be considered accessible or not?

I would also like to see a new combo GFCI and switch device for the garbage disposal. Although even that would not be viable where an air switch is designed into the counter top for looks.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
And under the new rules would a blank face GFCI inside the cabinet under the sink be considered accessible or not?

I would also like to see a new combo GFCI and switch device for the garbage disposal. Although even that would not be viable where an air switch is designed into the counter top for looks.

The requirement is "readily accessible" and under the sink cabinet just happens to be one area where interpretation will likely vary from one AHJ to another. It could even be acceptable in some areas to have it right near the cabinet opening but not acceptable in the far back corner of same cabinet.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
Here is section 210.8(A) and 210.12.

210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for
Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for
personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through
(C). The ground-fault circuit-interrupter shall be installed in
a readily accessible location.
Informational Note: See 215.9 for ground-fault circuitinterrupter
protection for personnel on feeders.
(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
210.8(A)(1) through (10) shall have ground-fault circuitinterrupter
protection for personnel.
(1) Bathrooms
(2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a
floor located at or below grade level not intended as
habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work
areas, and areas of similar use
(3) Outdoors
Exception to (3): Receptacles that are not readily accessible
and are supplied by a branch circuit dedicated to
electric snow-melting, deicing, or pipeline and vessel heating
equipment shall be permitted to be installed in accordance
with 426.28 or 427.22, as applicable.
(4) Crawl spaces ? at or below grade level
(5) Unfinished basements ? for purposes of this section,
unfinished basements are defined as portions or areasof the basement not intended as habitable rooms and
limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like
Exception to (5): A receptacle supplying only a permanently
installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall
not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter
protection.
Informational Note: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for
power supply requirements for fire alarm systems.
Receptacles installed under the exception to
210.8(A)(5) shall not be considered as meeting the
requirements of 210.52(G)
(6) Kitchens ? where the receptacles are installed to
serve the countertop surfaces
(7) Sinks ? where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m
(6 ft) of the outside edge of the sink
(8) Boathouses
(9) Bathtubs or shower stalls ? where receptacles are
installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the
bathtub or shower stall
(10) Laundry areas
The big change here is the addition of all sinks in (7) and the addition of (10) for laundry areas.

Here is the new 210.8(D)

(D) Kitchen Dishwasher Branch Circuit. GFCI protection
shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers
installed in dwelling unit locations.
Dishwashers are now required to be GFCI protected whether cord and plug connected or hardwired.

For 210.12 the additional areas now requiring AFCI protection are kitchens and laundry areas.

210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault
circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required
in 210.12(A) (B), and (C). The arc-fault circuit interrupter
shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
the means described in 210.12(A)(1) through (6):
Chris
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Thanks I tried to get the online version of NEC - but it requires Java script - Java has a lot of security isses and I don't use and couldn't get it work anyway.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks I tried to get the online version of NEC - but it requires Java script - Java has a lot of security isses and I don't use and couldn't get it work anyway.
Don't confuse Java with Javascript. They are totally different environments, although both have their security issues. Javascript is not nearly as great a threat to your computer as Java. The security of Javascript is primarily determined by your browser and its add-ins, while the security of Java is primarily determined by the version of Java you have downloaded and the way it interacts with your particular operating system.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Don't confuse Java with Javascript. They are totally different environments, although both have their security issues. Javascript is not nearly as great a threat to your computer as Java. The security of Javascript is primarily determined by your browser and its add-ins, while the security of Java is primarily determined by the version of Java you have downloaded and the way it interacts with your particular operating system.
And if you really don't want to deal with potential threats.... don't use your computer at all, at least with any connection to the outside world.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Here is section 210.8(A) and 210.12.



The big change here is the addition of all sinks in (7) and the addition of (10) for laundry areas.

Here is the new 210.8(D)



Dishwashers are now required to be GFCI protected whether cord and plug connected or hardwired.

For 210.12 the additional areas now requiring AFCI protection are kitchens and laundry areas.



Chris
What are reasons for the proposal to have GFCI on dishwashers in the first place? Have there been any significant numbers of incidents where people were electrocuted by a dishwasher? That is what puzzles me, most other GFCI requirements make a little more sense and probably have some statistics that make it seem more obvious there is a need.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
And if you really don't want to deal with potential threats.... don't use your computer at all, at least with any connection to the outside world.
The DOD has a set of classifications for security of operating systems (running on specific tested hardware platforms too). The highest security rating was finally granted to a specific Microsoft-based OS in a highly locked down configuration, but only on the condition that the computer not be connected to any network hardware.
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
What are reasons for the proposal to have GFCI on dishwashers in the first place? Have there been any significant numbers of incidents where people were electrocuted by a dishwasher? That is what puzzles me, most other GFCI requirements make a little more sense and probably have some statistics that make it seem more obvious there is a need.
The substantiation for the GFCI requirement for dishwashers is based on end of life issues with certain appliances. As motor driven appliances age, the motor windings degrade and the insulation can break down and create leakage current in excess of what is considered a safe limit. The appliance manufactures were the people that purposed this code change.

Here is the ROP

_______________________________________________________________________________________________
2-58 Log #2561 NEC-P02
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Jay A. Broniak, GE Appliances & Lighting
Revise text to read as follows:
This form proposal is for requiring ground-fault circuit-interrupt (GFCI) protection on the dishwasher circuit.
Section 210.8
GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed
in dwelling unit locations.
As the requirement for ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCIs) has been expanded throughout the NEC
code, the amount of electrical shock incidents related to consumer products have continued to decline over time.
Increased usage of GFCls within branch circuits of residential homes is a highly effective means of further reducing the
potential for electrical shocks. CMP-2 should require GFCI protection on the dishwasher circuit.
The submitter has not provided adequate substantiation to warrant the expansion of GFCI
protection to branch circuits supplying dishwashers.
As you can see this proposal failed at the proposal stage.

Here is the ROC

Report on Comments ? June 2013
NFPA 70
_______________________________________________
________________________________________________
2-29 Log #566 NEC-P02
_______________________________________________
________________________________________________
Jay A. Broniak, GE Appliances & Lighting
2-58
Revise text to read as follows:
This form proposal is for requiring ground-fault circuit-interrupt (GFCI) protection on the dishwasher circuit.
Section 210.8
GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in dwelling unit locations.
As the requirement for ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCIs) has been expanded throughout the NEC
code, the amount of electrical shock incidents related to consumer products have continued to decline over time.
Increased usage of GFCls within branch circuits of residential homes is a highly effective means of further reducing the
potential for electrical shocks. CMP-2 should require GFCI protection on the dishwasher circuit.
This Comment passed on a 9 to 4 vote. Here is some of the dissenting comments

2-29
Eligible To Vote:13 Affirmative: 9 Negative: 4 Abstain: 0 Not Returned: 0
210.8(D)
(Log # 566 )
Negative
Hilbert, M.
The action should have been to accept this comment in principle. See my ballot comment on Comment 2-22.
This comment should have been rejected as it does not address the root cause. Most of the substantiation to provide to GFCI protection for
dishwashers was related to concerns with an appliance. The submitter indicated the vast majority of failures have been related to either end of life
component use, unexplained electronic circuitry error, or poor quality control as indicated by chafed wiring. There is no question to the fact that
either AFCI or GFCI protection may have prevented many of these unfortunate events from happening in the first place, but they should not be used
to address an appliance problem. If the manufacturing process remains unchanged it does nothing in the terms of safety for the existing dwellings
in this country when it becomes time to replace appliances. Article 210 contains rules for receptacle placement and due to the unlimited possibilities of cord-and-plug connected equipment
that can be supplied from those receptacles the existing rules in 210.8(A) and (B) are appropriate. Understanding it would be unrealistic
to address the many different types of portable appliances individually, it makes perfect sense to require GFCI protection for the 15 and 20 ampere
, 125 volt, receptacles in areas where they most likely to be used. However, fixed appliances such as dishwashers, washing machines and the GFCI protection
requirements for them maybe more appropriately covered in Chapter Four. The GFCI protection rules for cord-and-plug connected vending machines and electric drinking fountains
already exist in Article 422 along with leakage-current detector-interrupter (LCDI) or arc-fault circuit-interrupter (AFCI) rules for window air conditioners in Article 440.
Boat hoists are also specific equipment so the GFCI rules for them may be more appropriately located in Article 422 or Article 610.
It seems that locating the GFCI requirements for specific equipment to Chapter Four or Six as appropriate would promote greater consistency in
the NEC. It may be appropriate for a task group with members from CMP 2 and CMP 17 for possible proposals for the 2017 NEC.


Mitchem, J.
This comment should have been rejected. The substantiation was based on the lack of protective functions within the equipment. The concern about
product safety should be addressed through relevant product safety standards instead of depending on external means for safety of the users

Orlowski, S.
NAHB urges the members of the panel to reject this comment . As we stated in the ROC meeting, other than providing the panel with a presentation on how products fail over a period of time,
there was no substantiation provided by the original proponent to expand GFCI protection to dishwashers. No statistics or data were provided to the panel showing any injuries or deaths associated
to electrical shock from these appliances. No proof was provided to support the committees assumption that there is an increased risk of electrical shock with these appliances.
As we stated previously, the NEC should not be used as a tool to negate the due diligence of appliance manufacturers in designing consumer safe products.

Wilkinson, R.
If you read the submitter?s substantiation,one must believe that if a little good, more protection is great. There is no technical support to warrant additional protection for a dishwaster.
Chris
 

wirebender

Senior Member
210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault
circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required
in 210.12(A) (B), and (C). The arc-fault circuit interrupter
shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
the means described in 210.12(A)(1) through (6):

I guess that ends the debate about switches that are in areas requiring AFCI but controlling lights in areas that aren't?
So, pretty much all lighting will be AFCI protected?
except the bathroom, of course.
 
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