Altered luminaries in gas station canopy

smallfish

Senior Member
High intensity discharge luminaries were altered to LED in the canopy located about 13 feet over gas station pumps by an installer who the owner says cannot be reached. The luminaries have no lens to cover the LEDs. As inspector I know the altering of these luminaries void their listing. Do you know of any specific standards or requirements for luminaries in gas station canopies? I would like to know how unsafe these luminaries are.
I have attached a photo looking up at the recessed luminaries in the canopy.
Thanks
 

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smallfish

Senior Member
gas station canopy altered luminarie

gas station canopy altered luminarie

High intensity discharge luminaries were altered to LED in the canopy located about 13 feet over gas station pumps by an installer who the owner says cannot be reached. The luminaries have no lens to cover the LEDs. As inspector I know the altering of these luminaries void their listing. Do you know of any specific standards or requirements for luminaries in gas station canopies? I would like to know how unsafe these luminaries are.
I have attached a photo looking up at the recessed luminaries in the canopy.
Thanks
 

Attachments

rbalex

Moderator
Staff member
... Do you know of any specific standards or requirements for luminaries in gas station canopies? ...
See Section 511.7 as cross referenced by 514.7. Not applicable in this case, but there are added cautions for lighter than air fuels. [See Section/Table 514.3(B)(2)]
 

jrannis

Senior Member
High intensity discharge luminaries were altered to LED in the canopy located about 13 feet over gas station pumps by an installer who the owner says cannot be reached. The luminaries have no lens to cover the LEDs. As inspector I know the altering of these luminaries void their listing. Do you know of any specific standards or requirements for luminaries in gas station canopies? I would like to know how unsafe these luminaries are.
I have attached a photo looking up at the recessed luminaries in the canopy.
Thanks
I recognize those LEDs, we use them in signs, they are listed and are weatherproof and sealed. They can be used with any 12volt DC driver and connected with class ll wiring.
Something like this :


http://www.piedmontplastics.com/products/electric-sign--leds/led-lighting.aspx
 
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PetrosA

Senior Member
I recognize those LEDs, we use them in signs, they are listed and are weatherproof and sealed. They can be used with any 12volt DC driver and connected with class ll wiring.
Something like this :


http://www.piedmontplastics.com/products/electric-sign--leds/led-lighting.aspx
I don't think that gets the guy out of the problem of using them in existing fixtures with the covers removed and calling it a retrofit. It's obviously not fitted well enough to be a manufacturer authorized retrofit kit.
 

jrannis

Senior Member
I don't think that gets the guy out of the problem of using them in existing fixtures with the covers removed and calling it a retrofit. It's obviously not fitted well enough to be a manufacturer authorized retrofit kit.
They are normally sticky back and weatherproof rated. It's ugly but most likely just fine.
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
They are normally sticky back and weatherproof rated. It's ugly but most likely just fine.
I know the kind of lights, but the way the new (?) backplate is fitted looks like someone hacked up some white colored melamine and stuck the LEDs to it, then screwed it in place to something or other. If it fit properly, the cover would still be on there and no one would have even noticed.
 

broadgage

Senior Member
It looks to me as though the LED lighting will be liable to overheat if installed as illustrated.
It would appear that the product is intended to be used to replace fluorescent tubes in signs, with the LED modules spaced out in a line, and not tightly packed together as is illustrated.
If the manufacturerer specifies a minimum area per LED lamp or module, and this has not been followed, then it could be argued that this is a violation.

I still doubt that it is actually dangerous though it may have a short life.
Whilst gasoline fumes are highly flammable, they are also much heavier than air, and presence of lighting equipment well above the fuel filling point is of little consequence.
 

tesi1

Member
:happyyes: you may want to check with a company known as lsi lighting, their specialty is gas canopy & station lighting, the series of the original fixture base is known
as a Scottsdale series, I donot know who made the led's shown, but lsi has an approved led replacement kit for these fixtures
 
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